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Nick, Morgan C. June 9,1995; Arkansas 6 YO
Topic Started: Aug 27 2006, 11:26 PM (9,060 Views)
oldies4mari2004
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http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/n/nick_morgan.html

Morgan Chauntel Nick



Top Row and Bottom Left: Nick, circa 1995;
Bottom Right: Age-progression at age 17 (circa 2005)


Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance

Missing Since: June 9, 1995 from Alma, Arkansas
Classification: Non-Family Abduction
Date Of Birth: September 12, 1988
Age: 6 years old
Height and Weight: 4'0, 55 pounds
Distinguishing Characteristics: Caucasian female. Blonde hair, blue eyes. Nick had five visible silver caps on her molars at the time of her 1995 disappearance; the caps were scheduled to be removed in 2000. Her teeth were crowded at the time of her 1995 disappearance and she will need orthodontic braces in adolescence. Nick has a protruding purple vein on the lower left side of her rib cage.
Clothing/Jewelry Description: A green Girl Scouts t-shirt, blue denim shorts and white leather tennis shoes.


Details of Disappearance

Nick attended a Little League Baseball game with her mother in Alma, Arkansas on June 9, 1995. She joined her friends to catch lightning bugs near the baseball field later in the evening. Nick was last seen at approximately 10:45 p.m. as she stood near her mother's Nissan Stanza in the parking lot. She was emptying sand from her shoes at the time. Nick has never been heard from again.
Witnesses told authorities that they observed an unidentified Caucasian male watching Nick play on the field earlier in the night. The man apparently approached a group of children playing with Nick and asked them a question; investigators have not publicly released any additional details about the conversation. The suspect is described as being approximately 23 to 38 years old in 1995, 6'0 and 180 pounds. He had a moustache and three to four days' growth of beard. The suspect had black or salt-and-pepper hair, which was combed to the back and possibly curly. Two sketches of Nick's alleged abductor are posted below this case summary. He wore cut-off blue jean shorts and no shirt or shoes and spoke with a "hillbilly" dialect or accent. He also had a hairy chest.

The unidentified man may have been driving a red Ford pickup truck with a white camper, which had windows covered with curtains. The vehicle left the field's parking lot at approximately the same time Nick disappeared. The truck had a short wheel base and a dull paint job due to age. The camper was possibly damaged on its right rear end. Witnesses stated that the camper appeared to be four to five inches shorter than the truck.

Two attempted abductions occurred area on June 9 and 10. In Alma, a suspect resembling Nick's abductor enticed a four-year-old girl into his red truck. The abduction was interrupted and the girl saved when her mother saw them and screamed. In Fort Smith, fifteen miles from Alma, a suspect tried to entice a nine-year-old girl into the men's restroom at a convenience store. He stopped when the girl resisted. Authorities announced that the incidents involved the same man. While the individual involved in these incidents has not been confirmed to be the same man sought in Nick's case, he resembled the Nick suspect and so did his truck, and authorities believe the events are linked.

There have been unconfirmed sightings of Nick throughout recent years, but she has not been located. The suspect and his possible vehicle remain at large.



Above Images: Sketches of Nick's possible abductor


Investigating Agency
If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
Alma Police Department
501-632-3930
OR
Arkansas State Police
501-783-5195
OR
Federal Bureau Of Investigation
202-324-3000



Source Information
The National Center For Missing and Exploited Children
Child Protection Education Of America
The Morgan Nick Foundation
New York State Missing and Exploited Children Clearinghouse
Nation's Missing Children Organization
The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
LostKids
Arkansas State Police
America's Most Wanted



Updated 3 times since October 12, 2004.

Last updated October 5, 2006; age-progression updated.

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Age-progression at age 17 (circa 2005)
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.acic.org/missing/search.php?DET...d=test&limit=20
Morgan Chauntel Nick
DOB 1988-09-12
Race W
Height 4' 0"
Weight 55 lbs.
Eyes BLU
Hair BLN
Circumstances Child's photo is shown age-progressed. Child was abducted by an unknown white male while she was playing at a ballpark in Alma, Arkansas. She has 5 visible silver caps on her molars. She was last seen wearing a green Girl Scout shirt, blue denim shorts and white tennis shoes.
Date Missing 1995-06-09
City of Report Alma
State of Report AR
Case Number 805103
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Attachments: nick_morgan_ap.jpg (11.02 KB)
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Age Progression Photo of Missing Girl
Investigators from the multiple law enforcement agencies assigned to the Morgan Nick abduction case have updated their files to include a new sketch of an unknown man wanted for questioning in connection with the disappearance of the child.

Morgan Nick was abducted from a baseball field at Alma on June 9th 1995. Early on in the search for the six-year-old child, police developed information about a man seen at the ball park who may have been in an older model faded red Ford pick-up truck.

The unknown man was described at the time as Caucasian, approximately six-feet tall, in his late 20's or early 30's, muscular build with short dark colored, or black hair and a short mustache and beard (3 to 4 day growth of facial hair). The man was wearing only cut-off blue jean shorts (no shirt or shoes). Individuals who saw the man say his chest was "hairy" and his voice/dialect pattern was described as "hillbilly".

Witnesses also report the pick-up truck the man was seen near or in had a camper shell with windows, covered by curtains, possibly on both sides of the truck.


Since the abduction, several age enhanced photographs of Morgan as she might appear today have been developed by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

For more information about the Morgan Nick case and age enhanced photographs, visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children website.

There is a $60,000 reward offered for information to anyone who can give investigators information that will help solve the case.

If you know anything about this case, please contact the Arkansas State Police via e-mail or by calling the telephone number below.

Arkansas State Police Crime Hotline (800) 553-3820

http://www.asp.state.ar.us/asp/hot_cases.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.katv.com/news/stories/0506/329352.html

Arkansas More Advanced in Finding Missing Children Since Morgan Nick's Disappearance
Friday May 19, 2006 6:56pm Reporter: Michelle Rupp Posted By: Amanda Manatt

Little Rock - After the disappearance of Morgan Nick, the state has made numerous advancements in trying to locate missing children. More than 50 missing children have been recovered since the Morgan Nick Amber Alert System went into effect in Arkansas.

(Matt DeCample, Atty. General’s Office) "We're one of the first five states in the country to have a statewide alert."

The establishment of the Morgan Nick Amber Alert is undoubtedly the biggest change. Matt DeCample with the Attorney General's Office says in addition to local law enforcement, grant money for education and prevention programs is something the state didn't have 10 years ago.

(DeCample) "You had grants that created our Keys to Safety Program that started mainly to prevent children from going missing and has grown to Internet safety, law, education for kids."

Other programs include the Safety Fair, Child ID’s, observance of the Missing Children's Day, and with the advancement of technology, wireless subscribers can receive wireless Morgan Nick Amber Alerts. To register for this feature, contact the Arkansas Attorney General’s office.

(DeCample) "All these things have snow balled from that one flash point of Morgan's disappearance that created interest and awareness that's grown over the past 10 years."

One of the biggest tools in this fight is the new center at the State Police Headquarters to help locate missing children.



Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.katv.com/news/stories/0506/329350.html

Morgan Nick's Class Presents Scholarship in Her Honor
Friday May 19, 2006 6:34pm Reporter: Christina Muńoz Posted By: Amanda Manatt





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Arkansas More Advanced in Finding Missing Children Since Morgan Nick's Disappearance



Ozark - It's an emotional graduation ceremony Friday night in Ozark where Morgan Nick would have been graduating high school.

Friday was a day of mixed emotions. As 110 seniors will be getting their diplomas and eagerly beginning the next chapters of their lives, one of the students in the graduating class does not get that opportunity.

You may remember the story on June 9, 1995, 6-year-old Morgan Nick was abducted from a baseball field. Alma police searched extensively and over the years have chased down several leads, but nothing of significance. Morgan has never been found. She would now be 17 years old.

Although Morgan would have been graduating tonight her classmates do not want her to be forgotten. The students told their principal they wanted to give a scholarship in Morgan’s name to one of the graduating seniors with left-over money they raised for their prom.

The Ozark High Principal says he is very proud of the students.
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.katv.com/news/stories/0806/353961.html

Investigators in Morgan Nick Case Interested in Karr
Friday August 18, 2006 9:08pm Posted By: Cassie Cummings





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Alma - A suspect in the JonBenet Ramsey case has provoked police in Crawford County to investigate the 1995 abduction of Morgan Nick.

Alma Police say they want to know more about John Mark Karr, who was arrested in Thailand this week and held as a suspect in the death of JonBenet.

Police Chief Russell White says investigators want to know if Karr was in Western Arkansas in June 1995, when Morgan disappeared.

White says Karr is not a suspect in the Nick abduction.

(Chief Russell White, Alma Police Chief) "He's not a suspect in our case; he's a person of interest because of the type of crime he's accused of."

Investigators will attempt to discover Karr’s whereabouts from 1995 and search for any possible connection to the area.

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.4029tv.com/news/4855234/detail.html

ALMA, Ark. -- One day after an estimated 24 million people watched Colleen Nick's family in Alma receive an extreme home makeover, the family and local police wait for the lead that could bring Morgan Nick home.

Morgan Nick was abducted more than 10 years ago at a youth baseball game in Alma. She was six years old at the time. Come Sept. 12, she'll turn 17.

Reaction | Take A Tour


With all the television publicity centering on this makeover episode, police and Colleen Nick -- Morgan's mother -- said they have high hopes Morgan will come home soon.

"We have great hopes for it," said Alma Police Chief Russell White. "We've aired to more people last night than ever before."

White said that all the publicity has generated phone calls.

"Any time that we can air Morgan's story to that many people in just about any format we can get it out there, it's gonna bring us leads," he said.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children said more than 100 calls came in during and after last night's show.

Colleen Nick said she's confident in those numbers.

"One out of every six missing children is found because someone recognizes their picture," Nick said. "We have 24 million people watching a show and you show pictures of 10 kids -- you just have to know that someone is coming home."

The National Center for Missing Children's phone lines have been down for much of the day. Representatives suggested even more tips could come in once the hotline is functional again.
Copyright 2006 TheHometownChannel.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.











Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.nwanews.com/story.php?paper=adg...&storyid=120342

Walk of Hope marks 10 th anniversary of Nick disappearance
BY BRANDON TUBBS

Posted on Sunday, June 26, 2005

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As three ducklings swam next to their mother while another duckling strayed across the MacArthur Park pond in Little Rock, parents, grandparents and friends gathered Saturday to remember Arkansas’ missing children and others.

Carrying posters showing the faces of the missing, about 50 Arkansans walked from the park to the state Capitol.

The inaugural Walk of Hope, sponsored by the Morgan Nick Foundation, was held Saturday to commemorate the 10 th anniversary of Morgan Nick’s disappearance.

Morgan Nick’s mother, Colleen, said the ducklings provided an analogy for what she and the others were bringing to attention.

At the Capitol, Colleen Nick told participants that events such as the walk keep the issues regarding missing children at the forefront. United, groups like it can reduce the number of missing children. "We need to bring our missing children home," she said.

To date, 330 Arkansas children are missing, Colleen Nick said. Morgan was 6 when she disappeared from an Alma ball field in 1995.

Asa Hutchinson, the keynote speaker, said much has been done to find missing children in the 10 years since Morgan disappeared, but much work remains. The Arkansas gubernatorial candidate and former undersecretary of the Department of Homeland Security said convicted sex offenders should be required to register their new addresses with law enforcement within 30 days.

Along the route, Andre Hill, Charles Hinton and Tina Robinson walked to remember their friend and Hinton’s sister, LaTarra Moore.

The University of Central Arkansas cheerleader and business major disappeared April 26, 1998. She was last seen at the 145 th Street Social Club at 1400 E. 145 th St. in an unincorporated area of Pulaski County. She left behind a son, Alvin Green, now 7, whose memories are built through the stories his grandmother and uncle tell.

Eric Neumeier, 25, of Scranton knows no one with a missing child but walked to show support. He had heard a radio advertisement about the walk. The senior analyst at Innovation Industries Inc. in Russellville has prompted the company to get involved too.

He carried the sign of Lori Murchinson-Dunbar, who disappeared Sept. 2, 1995, from Fort Smith. "I don’t know what these people feel, but to have someone show support... to try to help stop this," he said. "Everyone needs to pull together," he later said.

Rene Altheimer, Moore’s mother, was comforted by the turnout. "It’s always good when you don’t feel alone and feel support on a sad occasion," she said. "It’s also a blessing to be able to join together with these to share knowledge [of what to do].

" We won’t give up, that’s for sure. "

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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ALMA — On Sept. 11, 2001, Colleen Nick helped dedicate the Arbor of Hope at Little Rock’s MacArthur Park. As the surreal events of the terrorist attacks unfolded and commanded worldwide attention, Colleen thought of her missing daughter, Morgan. Her 13 th birthday fell the next day, Sept. 12. "I just remember feeling very connected to Morgan that day, thinking that she’ll be able to tell me where she was that day," said Colleen, in a near whisper. "And I’ll know where I was."

In the past decade, there haven’t been many days like that.

Colleen Nick’s firstborn has been missing 10 years. It’s been 3,650 days since Colleen last saw 6-year-old Morgan playing near a sand pile at an Alma ballpark, before she disappeared into the night.

Since then, the family has grappled with questions from the past as they move into their future. They take Morgan’s memory with them, and incorporate her into their lives as best they can.

After her daughter’s disappearance, Colleen started the Morgan Nick Foundation. Morgan’s name — "morning" in German — has become synonymous in Arkansas with efforts to keep children safe and help find those who are missing. Colleen has spent more time looking for Morgan than she had the girl by her side. "It just does not seem like 10 years could have gone by since the last time I saw Morgan," Colleen said, seated at her small kitchen table. Then, she softly added, "And there are other days when I feel every day of it in my soul."

Right after Mother’s Day, Colleen’s birthday and Memorial Day each year comes another anniversary: June 9. It’s another painful mark of the passage of time.

Her little girl is still lost.

Her little girl, now 16, isn’t little anymore.

Time hasn’t stood still for Colleen, either. She struggled with turning 30 on May 20, 1995. She was recently divorced with three young children. Then, just 20 days later, Morgan vanished. Newly 40, the mother has high hopes for the future.

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.nwanews.com/story.php?paper=adg...&storyid=118144

ALMA — The Morgan Nick Foundation is sponsoring a series of events this month to spotlight the plight of missing children.

The events are in conjunction with the 10 th anniversary of the disappearance of Morgan Nick. Morgan disappeared from an Alma baseball f ield on June 9, 1995, as her mother watched a championship youth baseball game.

She was 6 years old. "Morgan is 16 years old right now and she should be here preparing for her senior year in high school and planning her senior prom," Morgan’s mother, Colleen Nick, said at a news conference Wednesday. "It’s an absolute hope of mine that she will come home and be reunited with us."

The events, dubbed "Still Missing Morgan — 10 Years Too Long," range from a safety fair in Springdale to a walk to honor missing children in Little Rock. All of the events are free and open to the public.

At the safety fair, Alma police officers will collect children’s fingerprints and make photographic identifications for children.

There also will be various groups talking about child-safety issues. "The foundation was set up to protect families," Alma Police Chief Russell White said. "That was something Colleen didn’t have when Morgan went missing."

Police say more than 250 people were at the ballfield during the last minutes of the game on the night Morgan disappeared. Colleen Nick had given her oldest child permission to play with two other young people in a nearby sandbox.

Morgan was last seen sitting on the ground getting sand out of her shoes.

Witnesses said they saw a suspicious man standing around the ballfield and an unidentified, older model red truck was seen in the area. "Our information hasn’t changed very much from that night," White said. "We don’t know who was driving that truck or if that person was involved."

Colleen Nick told family, friends and a handful of media representatives gathered at Alma City Hall on Wednesday that she still believes her daughter is alive.

She said keeping Morgan’s case in the limelight is the key to finding her. "My hope is that by getting it out there locally and nationally, maybe she’ll see herself and know we’re looking for her," Colleen Nick said.

Taryn Nick, Morgan’s 11-yearold sister, read a poem that she wrote for the anniversary of her sister’s disappearance.

She talked about the sadness of not having her sister around and how other children tease her about Morgan’s disappearance. "I don’t understand why someone would take you," Taryn said. "It makes me sad and really mad."

For more information on the events, call the Morgan Nick Foundation at (877) 543-4673.

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.ardemgaz.com/prev/nick/index.asp

Little Girl Lost
Part I
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Story By
Andrea Harter
Photos by
David Gottschalk
When she was 3, Morgan Nick climbed up on a brick retaining wall outside her Kansas apartment, stretched out her small hands into the spring breeze, flapped and launched herself into the sky.
She did not fly.
Her mother, Colleen, heard her cries and came running. "Morgan,'' she asked, checking a scraped elbow, "why did you jump off of that wall? You could have broken your arm.''
Morgan sobbed. "I prayed so God could make me fly. God can make things fly.''
"Yes,'' her mother said, tending the arm and kissing her daughter's head. "He can make you fly if you are a bird. God did not make you a bird.''
Morgan considered that. She knew of God and his powers; her family holds fast to the power of believing. She'd been taught at an early age to pray, but she never again tried to fly.
By the time her family moved to Arkansas in 1993, Morgan's aspirations were earthbound. She wanted to be a doctor or a circus performer so she could dress up in costumes and dance and make people laugh. She liked to have her hair brushed and sometimes braided. She liked to look pretty.
More than anything, she wanted to lose a tooth. When school dismissed in May 1995, 6-year-old Morgan was the only one in her first-grade class at Ozark Elementary School who did not have a gap in her smile to poke her tongue through.
Her parents do not know what her smile looks like now. Nearly two years ago, nine days into June 1995, she vanished, plucked from a sand pile within sight of her mother during a Rookie League game at the Alma ballpark. It was the first time Morgan had been to a baseball game.
The tooth fairy has never come to her home at 312 N. Fifth St.
By now, Morgan is 8 1/2 years old and still lost. When she was a baby, she was a cotton-top. If family genetics have befriended her, she is tall for her age, willowy with blondish-brown hair. Two front teeth, maybe more, will be gone by now, and perhaps the permanent teeth have surfaced. In the back of her mouth are five silver caps put on about a month before she was stolen; she will have those caps until she is at least 12. Her teeth are crowded. She will need braces. Morgan sucked her thumb and cuddled with a security blanket until she was almost 5. Her mother wonders whether she has taken up the thumb again.
Colleen Nick wonders about a lot of things. Some things can't be said out loud. She can feel Morgan is alive. But that is all she is certain about.

Two separate worlds
In her home, there are two worlds: before and after the kidnapping.
There are traces of "before.'' On the paneled walls, happy pictures of the family. A progressive calendar denoting Morgan's milestones, like the time she was a toddler and poured cat food on the bathroom floor and gleefully sat down to play in it.
Mostly, there is "after.'' On Morgan's bedroom door (see top photo), a poster with hundreds of signatures surrounding a photocopy of her first-grade picture. Inside, a daybed obscured by unopened Christmas packages. From one shiny bag, a new Barbie doll smiles. There are 29 other gifts on the made-up bed, birthday presents for a girl turning 7. Then 8. All unopened.
Above the bed, on a pink wall bordered by windows with balloon curtains made of polished cotton and matching ties, decal butterflies flitter but never fly. At the foot of the bed are her mother's suitcases. Colleen travels a lot, speaking to police groups, raising awareness of the plight of stolen children. Next to the bed is Morgan's white dresser. Inside are shorts, socks, some winter clothes. In her closet, jumpers and dresses and bluejeans. They are all too small now.
The dresser was once dotted with young-girl things, pieces of paper with her name, scraps of doll accessories and Girl Scout pins. Now it holds icons of hope, we-miss-you messages, some from classmates, one from her pediatrician, another from the state police. Before that June night, Morgan's room was a reflection of a girl busy with playing dress-up and Barbie and house. On the bed and floor were her favorite animals, including a white toy cat named Emily.
When Morgan went to the game that night, the room was a mess. She had promised to clean it the next morning. Her mom had promised to buy her a lamp when she was done, because Morgan is afraid of the dark.
Colleen still waits to buy the lamp. For 2,461 days -- all of Morgan's life until that night -- Colleen always knew where her daughter was. Now she doesn't have a clue.
All she has of Morgan's youth are photographs, clothes, toys, lost keys and necklaces, mismatched socks and mimeographed alphabet sheets, with crooked and straight rows of Mmmmms and Nnnnns. A paper book she illustrated with crayons. Drawings of snowmen and misshapen hearts and home. The words to the Brownie Promise.
Not everything was kept; who knew its worth? Each jagged line, each backward Z. It is too late to retrieve all of Morgan's scraps from infancy and kindergarten. What's left is what's left: the blond clippings from her first haircut; a purple and pink bicycle, nearly new, leaning in a dark garage. For her mother, it has to be enough, until Morgan comes home.
It is hard to throw anything away. A forgotten Barbie sits outside on top of the kitchen air conditioner. Rain-beaten and bleached, unusable, it can't be discarded. It is Morgan's.
But some things may have to be left behind. Colleen is considering moving to Alma, where her mother, her church and her life now are. A foundation to find Morgan has been set up in the crossroads town where she was taken. The police command center is there. It is practical and wise to move, Colleen knows; but one day, she thinks, Morgan will try to find her way home. What if nobody's there?
Morgan will have a room at the new house. But moving involves touching Morgan's things, sealing boxes and memories.

Awaiting a brighter day
For two years, the light on the Nicks' front porch has burned all night. If they move, a new light will burn wherever they go.
While they wait, they plan.
Morgan's 5-year-old brother, Logan, is leggy and freckled, a sweet-faced boy whose innocence is shrouded by adult knowledge that bad things happen to good people. He knows about bad men who steal sisters. He wants to hurt them. He wants to ride bicycles and be a policeman when he grows up. He will get all of the bad men then.
When he is not talking about Morgan, Logan pursues boyish adventures. He snaps on a red plastic badge and wields a worn, unloaded cap gun. He loves small metal cars, and firetrucks that make noise, and Colleen's homemade chocolate chip cookies -- especially if he gets to crack the eggs. His favorite companion is a worn, striped stuffed tiger, lopped under his arm on his daily travels. He can ride about 100 feet unassisted on his two-wheel bike. So could Morgan.
Until Morgan comes home, he is the oldest child. This year, he is playing T-ball. At the ballpark from which Morgan was taken, Logan scored a home run. At the ballpark, his family releases pink balloons on the ninth of each month, with paper photos of Morgan tucked inside (see bottom photo).
In January, Logan will be 6. The same age as Morgan when he last knew her.
When he's afraid at night, he asks whether Morgan has a bed at the bad man's house. Colleen doesn't have the answer. Then he and his mom play a bedtime game: what we'll do when Morgan comes home.
She tells him: The police will call me and say they found her, and I will go get Morgan and bring her home and get you out of school and we will love her and kiss her and kiss her and kiss her until there are no more kisses to give.
He says: Then we will go to the police and I will tell them thank you. Thank you for finding my sister.
This is what they will do on the first night. Then they will turn off the front porch light. The rest has not been mapped.
It will be different for Taryn. She was 20 months old when her sissy got lost. In a few months, she'll be 4.
To her, there are two people missing: Morgan and her sissy. She knows Morgan by photographs, that crooked smile and cocked head; the image is burned into her mind. Logan, who was 3 when Morgan was lost, remembers more: Morgan would play with him, and sometimes dress him up in girl clothes.
Taryn and Logan play together, but at times they play apart in the same room -- usually the kitchen. Logan winds up his cars and fusses at his younger sister to move. Taryn busies herself with a Sit-N-Spin in the middle of the floor, going round and round and round, until she is dizzy. Logan and Taryn used to play on it together, but now they are too big.
Taryn's face is round and soft, with rainbow blue eyes. She is shy and appears skeptical of strangers. She likes to play house and pretend-cook and care for her beanbag baby, Jenny. She hates to have her corn-silk hair brushed. To some degree, Taryn and Morgan are as different as their names, but Taryn haunts the family. Their baby pictures are indistinguishable. Both have dimples. They have the same eyes.
Call it a mixed blessing: Taryn is a rerun of Morgan.
Morgan wanted to name her sister Emily, her favorite name, the name of her cuddly toy, the name of her cat. Her parents considered it.
What Taryn knows of her sister is that her mom is trying to find her. That there is an empty seat at the dining room table every night. And that her mother sometimes cries and sings the song of missing children, the "Bells of Love,'' when the video of lost babies is shown. Morgan's picture is on that tape, shown to police officers nationwide.
Morgan's disappearance is with them everywhere. An empty bird's nest tucked under the eave of the white frame house. Ribbons of faded pink climbing high into the cedar tree in the front yard. Even the buzz of a mosquito -- Morgan is allergic.
Then there are the angels, dozens of them, red, pink, and pink and white, cherubs with man-made wings, gifts from those who pledge hope for Morgan. On the kitchen wall is a wooden plaque etched in green: "Believe.''
It's Colleen's unpaid full-time job to find Morgan. She's been on Oprah's and a host of other talk and news broadcasts. She's been to the White House. She has an FBI T-shirt.
To sharpen her skills, she enrolled in Westark Community College in Fort Smith, where she made the dean's list. She drinks Pepsi for breakfast and lunch, and prays a lot. She papers her home with all of her children's handiwork.
"I don't want to build a shrine to Morgan. Logan and Taryn are just as important to me. I don't want them to get lost in all of this,'' she says.
Like Tripod, Morgan's grandma's three-legged cat, Colleen and her children manipulate their lives around a handicap, aware of the loss with each step they take.

different life
This is not how their life always was.
John Nick met Colleen Lockwood on a job in Van Buren in 1984. In a factory, they found love, knotting, tying and stapling foam to make couch cushions. After an eight-month courtship, they married.
Neither was content in Arkansas. They pulled up stakes and headed for Denver. They loved the climate but could not find jobs they liked. After a year, John decided to join the Army; he was ordered to Germany. It was a time of adventure. John learned how to maintain nuclear weapons and, later, how to repair helicopters and airplanes. Colleen kept house. Off duty, the couple saw Europe.
Four years into the marriage, Morgan was born. In German, her name means "morning.'' Her father remembers the day of her birth. He was nervous and excited. Colleen seemed calm and in control. She paced around their Hanau house, breathing, waiting until the pain peaked. When her labor pains accelerated, he drove her to the Army hospital, but there were no beds. He drove around looking for the nearest German hospital, but, once he found it, there was no place to park. He left the car on the street and ran inside to get a wheelchair.
Colleen struggled to get out of the small car, grabbed her pillow and lay down on the curb. It was cold for September.
John did not speak German. "No one could understand me. I was having to make hand motions about my pregnant wife and the baby. The only word we ever heard in English was after we got inside. It was 'push.' '' Colleen was in labor 17 hours. Morgan was born at 4:44 a.m. Sept. 12, 1988.
Morgan's first words were "Mama,'' then "Daddy.'' She walked a week after her first birthday. She was afraid of thunderstorms. Finger noodling around the back of her neck made her laugh; it is one of her few tickle spots.
In 1990, the Nick family was transferred to Georgia, then to Kansas. In March 1993, after John's tour was up, the family moved to Ozark, a blip of a town on the cusp of the Arkansas River. John found work in Fort Smith. Colleen started a day-care center called Wee Works. They separated in 1994 and were amicably divorced in January 1995. John takes care of Logan and Taryn on alternating weekends.
John, who comes from a hard-working Alma family, is quiet, a soft-spoken man with gentle blue eyes. He is not a large man -- Morgan's height comes from Colleen's side of the family -- but his baseball coach says he would come straight to practice from a day of landscaping yards with his father, then set the pace for the rest of the team.
While Colleen is at the forefront of the effort to find their daughter, John is the silent pillar of support. He goes to work at an electronics company each day and says a prayer for Morgan each night. It's hard to look at the cards and drawings his daughter made for him. On his kitchen counter are buttons with Morgan's face, the newest batch to pass out to friends.
He used to dig graves for the poor, something he won't do now; he won't think of death while Morgan is missing.
He cries when he talks of Morgan's love of spaghetti. She wanted it for breakfast. And she liked to be outside. Once, John took her fishing. "Didn't catch a thing. I had my pole in the water, and Morgan kept throwing rocks into the water. She liked the circles it made.'' He will never complain about the rocks again, he says.
He's angry that Morgan is still lost, but is not mad at Colleen.
"She is a good mother, the best. She'd never put any of the kids in any danger. It was a bad thing that happened, but I don't blame her,'' he says. "Mother's Day was so hard for her.''
In Colleen's family album, John is busy with the barbecue grill, or taking a nap with Morgan, or cuddling with Logan, or fussing with the Christmas tree. The album is a chronicle of Morgan's earliest days: a photo of a pregnant Colleen fixing up the nursery, another of Morgan when she was 2 hours old -- John snapped Colleen's face-splitting grin as she cuddled with her sleeping newborn -- the trio on holiday in Spain. Morgan in her high chair. There are videos, too. The couple bought a camera before Morgan was born and captured every milestone on tape, including her birth.
Morgan was a breast-fed baby; she had her first taste of jar baby food when she was 6 months old, when her family visited Alma. She sat on Colleen's knee; Granny Lockwood fed her.
Granny -- Joanna Lockwood -- taught her daughter Colleen and her four other children to believe in God and that God answers prayers, if not always right away.
So they wait. Granny Lockwood sews to pass the time. A week before the abduction, she taught Morgan to sew on a button and to whipstitch a simple hem. Some days, she tends the pink French pussy willow she's planted for Morgan; its soaring limbs bloom pink catkins in the spring. For Christmas, she made her grandchildren snuggle-quilts. Morgan's depicts Snow White. It was the hardest to sew.
Her former husband, David Lockwood, who lives in Ozark, is at a loss for words. "It's like we are stuck here in time,'' he says, rocking Taryn, who, instead of a thumb, sucks her middle three fingers when she is tired. He spends his days in retirement looking for his oldest grandchild and woodworking.
Twice before, briefly, the Lockwoods knew the fear of a lost child. Once, their eldest son was playing in tall grass and could not be seen. Another time, the youngest hid in a rack of clothes at a department store. Joanna Lockwood panicked both times. But she has only glimpsed the agony her daughter endures.
She remembers the call from Colleen late that Friday night, when she was watching television and baby-sitting Logan and Taryn. Colleen's voice was shrill: Mom, Morgan's missing.
Missing? How can a child be missing?

Fateful night
Granny Lockwood says she feels guilt for Morgan's disappearance. She would tell her daughter: You've got to learn to let her grow up a bit. You're over-protective. Give the child some room to be a kid.
That night, Colleen had heard those words in her head as Morgan whined about having to sit beside her mother on the wooden bleachers. They had come to watch the child of a friend play ball. Morgan was bored. Two other children had asked her to play in the sand pile. Could she go?
Colleen looked around. The sand pile was near; she could sprint there in seconds if Morgan got hurt. She consented. She watched her on the sand pile with the other kids and felt that perhaps Granny Lockwood had been right: She was keeping Morgan on too tight a tether.
Colleen turned her head to watch the game. The crowd was on its feet. The Marlins were ahead by two runs. The Pythons had last bat, bottom of the seventh. Parents of the 7- and 8-year-olds were yelling, the Marlins' for defense, the Pythons' for a base hit. The pitching machine shot a ball across the base. A player connected and got on base. The same thing happened again. There were two outs. The noise was deafening. A player whacked the ball, and two runners tied the game.
"You couldn't hear a thing,'' one coach recalled. "It was wild. Everyone was into the game.'' Another batter connected, and a run was scored; the Pythons had won.
But now, no one remembers the final score.
When Colleen stood up, Morgan's playmates came down the hill. Engines were starting; the crowd was thinning. It was about 10:30.
Where was Morgan?
The playmates, a boy and a girl, pointed to the sand pile. They said Morgan had been right there, emptying sand out of her shoe, leaning on Colleen's Nissan Stanza.
The ballfield is a scooped-out patch of clay below a slope cut deep with gullies. The sand pile was at the top of the hill. Morgan was gone.
The police were called, neighbors awakened, fans flagged down in their cars. Nobody had seen anything.
Morgan's playmates recall a man approaching them with a question and a comment, but police won't say what either was. The children have told what they remember. It has not helped. The police drew a composite of a suspect, based on witness reports from another abduction attempt that day in Alma. It may not be the man who took Morgan. In fact, Morgan's kidnapper may not be a man at all.
Morgan knows about "stranger danger.'' It was taught in school and reinforced by Colleen. Each morning, when she was ready for school, Morgan would wait by the door. Colleen would dress the children at her day care and walk them in a duck line one block to Morgan's bus stop. Each afternoon, the procession was reversed.
Colleen wanted to be careful. She told Morgan never to get into a car with someone she didn't know. And even if she knew the person, only if Mom said it was OK.
One day at school, Morgan got sick, and her mother was called. Colleen could not leave her day-care children unattended, so she called a policeman she knew on the Ozark force and asked him to pick up Morgan and drive her home. Morgan balked at getting into the car, reciting what she'd been told about strange cars, even police cars. The principal assured her it was all right; her mother had sent this officer to take her home. Even then, Morgan would not consent until her seat belt was fastened.
Memories like these clutch Colleen's heart.
Colleen's faith has been shaken only once. A body found in a suitcase in Benton County by trappers sent her mind racing. She sat alone in the dark, crying and praying, thinking of her daughter who loves apples and could eat a whole dinner of dill pickles. "It was the only time I've ever really thought, is this how it ends?'' she says. But it wasn't Morgan's body.
There have been other searches for bodies, but Colleen can feel that Morgan is alive.
Months after the kidnapping, in a dream, Colleen awoke to hear someone at the door. She couldn't see who it was, but she could feel it was Morgan. In the fog of awakening, she was tempted to unlock the door so her daughter wouldn't have to fumble with the latch.
Then daylight came.



Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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oldies4mari2004
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At 10:45 p.m. on June 9, 1995 in Alma, Arkansas, six year old Morgan Nick was abducted from a little league ball game by an unidentified man. She was attending the game with her mother and had joined some friends to catch lightning bugs. Morgan was last seen standing near her mother's car where she had stopped to empty sand from her shoes.



Witnesses observed a man watching the youngster as she was playing with other children at the park. The witness also saw a red Ford pickup with a white camper parked nearby that disappeared at about the same time as the girl. The camper is possibly damaged at the right rear, and was described as four or five inches too short for the truck, which has a short wheel base and paint dulled by age. The truck is believed to have Arkansas license plates.



The man was described as white, 6 feet tall, with a medium to solid build, a mustache and a 1-inch beard. He is believed to be 23-38 years old with black or "salt and pepper" hair, combed to the back, possibly curly. Click here to see a composite sketch.



Morgan is approximately 4 feet tall, about 55 pounds, has blonde hair and blue eyes. Morgan has 5 visible silver caps on her molars. She was last seen wearing a green Girl Scout t-shirt, blue denim shorts and white tennis shoes.



A massive investigation has turned up thousands of leads, but still no solid clues to the whereabouts of Morgan Nick or her abductor. The FBI and local communities have offered a $60,000 reward for the recovery of Morgan Chauntel Nick and the identification, arrest and conviction of subject or subjects responsible for her abduction.



The search continues to move forward. There have been numerous possible sightings of Morgan across the United States. Morgan's parents believe that Morgan is still alive and hope that with continued media coverage, someone will be able to provide them with information that could bring their daughter home.

(Morgan's Story, courtesy of The Morgan Nick Foundation)



For more info, please visit the Morgan Nick Foundation website: <!--EZCODE LINK START-->Morgan Nick Foundation<!--EZCODE LINK END-->

<p></p>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub165.ezboard.com/bcrimeandjustice13552.showUserPublicProfile?gid=formerwichitan>Former Wichitan</A> at: 4/12/04 2:56 am



(IMG:http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-4/154448/yellowvwDen.gif)




Composite sketch of Morgan's abductor:



www.morgannick.com/composite.htm

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Feb 3 2007, 06:13 PM Post #7


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Nick Talks Of Drawing Strength From Faith
Mother of abducted child addresses women's conference

This article was published on Friday, February 2, 2007 7:27 PM CST in Religion
By Debbie Miller
The Morning News

On the homefront, she clings to the continuing hope that daughter Morgan, abducted 11 1/2 years ago, will return to her.

On a national stage, Nick works through the Morgan Nick Foundation to recover missing children across the country and to provide support to families of missing children.

In her personal journey, she keeps the faith, too.

The Alma resident shared glimpses into her Christian walk during a women's conference at the Church at Pinnacle Hills on Jan. 27. Approximately 490 women attended the two-day conference.

A video from a Christian broadcasting network played prior to Nick's remarks and included a refrain Nick later repeated to her live audience.

"When life is trying to put you down, let it take you to your knees," she told the women. "When you hit your knees (in prayer), that's when God can do his very best."

Nick suggested to the audience that some might harbor private pain, "tears in the night that no one but God sees." She urged her audience to know God sees the hurts.

Some others have told Nick she's strong or she's extraordinary.

She rejects both adjectives.

"The fact is I'm just incredibly ordinary," she said, "but I'm passionate."

She readily acknowledged tough times, recalling a moment when she felt so low she "couldn't even look up and see bottom." Yet, God provided her with a peace, she said.

Nick referred her audience to chapters 11 and 12 of Hebrews, which details a list of men and women faithful to God's call.

Today's readers look at the Scripture and assume people like Moses and Abraham never had a moment of doubt, never questioned and were never afraid, Nick said.

That's because people who read the words now are looking back with the knowledge of how things turned out, she suggested.

"You think Moses' mother didn't have trembling hands" putting her baby in the water? Nick asked.

Such actions of faith have a message for others, she said. Tough times come. The bank account is empty, and people don't know how they're going to pay the bills. Kids get sick. Loved ones die.

Nick said still, God is always there. "He always has an answer for us."

Stand on faith, she encouraged her audience. It's something ordinary people do every day.
The Morning News: Religion : Nick Talks Of Drawing Strength From Faith



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http://z13.invisionfree.com/PorchlightUSA/...opic=1158&st=0&
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
video with Morgan's mom

http://www.4029tv.com/video/18314324/index.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
Morgan Nick's Family Speaks Out On Adam Walsh Case

POSTED: 12:17 am CST December 19, 2008
UPDATED: 9:36 am CST December 19, 2008


FORT SMITH, Ark. -- Nearly 30 years after his son’s murder John Walsh, host of the TV show America’s Most Wanted, finally received closure this week.

Morgan Nick's Family Speaks Out On Adam Walsh Case

Police in Florida closed the case and said it was Ottis Toole who killed Adam Walsh. Toole was a convicted pedophile and serial killer who died in prison in 1996. He was serving five life sentences related to other charges.

In Northwest Arkansas the abduction of 6-year-old Morgan Nick 13 years ago remains unsolved.

The Nick family has become personal friends with the Walsh family over the years, and they continue to work tirelessly in Morgan’s honor searching for the clues that will one day bring her home.

Adam’s parents John and Reve have been on a crusade ever since he was abducted and murdered back in 1981 in Hollywood, Fla.

On Tuesday police linked Toole with the crime which gave the Walsh family the closure they’d been seeking for nearly three decades.

“For 27 years we have been asking, 'Who could take a 6-year-old boy and murder him and decapitate him?' We needed to know, we needed to know,” said John.

“They’ve (John and Reve) have been such examples of not giving up,” said Colleen Nick, Morgan’s mother. “It’s been 27 years since Adam was taken and their fight is an inspiration to all of us who refuse to give up because we know the answers are out there.”

Colleen sits on the board of directors for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, an organization founded by John.

Morgan, Colleen’s daughter, was abducted from an Alma, Ark., baseball field June 9, 1995.

“I remember standing outside the fire station on the fourth day and somebody saying to me, ‘It’s only been four days’ thinking that was helpful,” Colleen recalled. “I never thought that we would be here all these years later.”

Colleen, a close friend to the Walsh’s, said seeing the family find closure in their case was difficult to watch.

“To have somebody finally say, ‘This is the person who took Adam, this is the person who stole his life’ it’s heart wrenching to watch them just kind of absorbing that in front of our nations. It’s heartbreaking for us,” said Colleen.

Since Morgan’s abduction Colleen has started a foundation in her daughter’s name and has worked on numerous programs and legislation related to child abductions. And through the years Colleen hasn’t given up hope that one day her angel will come home.

“I still believe after 13 years that we will find Morgan. I know that there’s an answer. I know that somebody knows where she is,” said Colleen. “I know that somebody knows what happened to her.

Morgan’s case continues to draw attention. Her picture and story were recently featured in USA Today, and leads continue to come into law enforcement officials.

Colleen said that the Walsh case gives her the strength to continue her fight until the day her daughter is safe in her arms.

To learn more about the Morgan Nick Foundation visit www.morgannick.com.
http://www.4029tv.com/news/18314679/detail.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
Reported by: J.R. Davis
Tuesday, Jun 9, 2009 @09:41pm CST
view largerIt was 14 years ago today that Morgan Nick disappeared from an Alma ballpark.

Earlier Tuesday evening, the Nick family gathered with friends and family to remember their daughter. Morgan was 6 years old when she disappeared.

Colleen Nick says its important to remember her daughter.


"Until you know, until you have proof, until there's a reason to quit, it's never time to give up hope. We never expected to be here 14 years later, but it's not time to give up yet," said Nick.


Since her daughter's disappearance, Colleen Nick has become an advocate for missing children.
http://nwahomepage.com/content/fulltext/?cid=95911
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
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http://www.reuters.com/article/pressReleas...009+PRN20090922
74 Families of Missing Children Team Together to Provide Help and Comfort to Other...
Tue Sep 22, 2009 8:01am EDT
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74 Families of Missing Children Team Together to Provide Help and Comfort to
Other Families with Missing Children

Families from 64 Cities and 30 States Attend Team HOPE Training at the
National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

The discovery of Jaycee Dugard has given renewed hope to many families of
missing children throughout the nation. Seventy-four family members who have
personally experienced the pain of a missing child have registered to attend
training as a Team HOPE volunteer for the National Center for Missing &
Exploited Children (NCMEC). The training will take place on September 25,
2009 at the organization's headquarters in Alexandria, VA.

Team HOPE, which stands for Help Offering Parents Empowerment, is a unique
program that NCMEC makes available to families of missing or sexually
exploited children. Team HOPE volunteers are family members of missing
children or sexually exploited children. Volunteers are trained and after
assisting other families for a year are invited for retraining.

The September program is a retraining program for Team HOPE volunteers.
Attendees will travel from 64 cities and 30 states, and 2 Canadian provinces.

Seventy-four of those attending the training are family members of missing
children. Included in the seventy-four are family members of 15 children who
are currently missing (a list of those cases is attached).

Also participating in the training is Doris Ownby, mother of recovered missing
child Ben Ownby who was 13 when he went missing from Beaufort, Missouri in
2007. Ben was recovered after an intensive investigation which also located
missing child Shawn Hornbeck who disappeared in 2002.

"Parents of missing and exploited children have suffered a great loss, perhaps
the greatest their family will ever endure. They are members of a club that
no one wants to belong to. Many of these families have spent decades looking
for their children never giving up hope." Said Ernie Allen, President & CEO
of NCMEC. "They are the only ones who can truly understand the pain other
families of missing and exploited children are going through. Despite their
own pain and suffering they want to help other families. This is a very
unique program. It an example of extraordinary kindness, the strength of the
human spirit and the power of hope."

Team HOPE is comprised of mothers, fathers, siblings and extended family
members of missing or exploited children who volunteer their time and are
trained to help other victim families. Volunteers are matched with families
who have had similar experiences. Because of their personal experience Team
HOPE volunteers are uniquely qualified to offer emotional support, compassion,
guidance, empowerment and assistance in ways traditional community service
agencies can not provide.

Since its creation more than 10 years ago, Team HOPE has trained more than 235
volunteers and helped more than 40,000 families. Candidates to become a Team
HOPE volunteer are nominated from a variety of sources including: other
active Team HOPE volunteers; law enforcement; state missing children
clearinghouses; nonprofit organizations dealing with missing children issues;
and some families contact NCMEC directly.

This year the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children observes its
25th anniversary. NCMEC has played a role in the recovery of more than 138,500
children. Today more children come home safely than ever before. In 2008,
NCMEC helped recover more children than any other year in the organization's
25-year history raising the recovery rate from 62% in 1990 to 97% today. And
more of those who prey on children are being identified and prosecuted. Yet
too many children are still missing and too many children are still the
victims of sexual exploitation. There is much more that needs to be done.

About the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children is a 501©(3) nonprofit
organization. Since it was established by Congress in 1984, the organization
has operated the toll-free 24-hour national missing children's hotline which
has handled more than 2,400,000 calls. It has assisted law enforcement in the
recovery of more than 142,000 children. The organization's CyberTipline has
handled more than 733,690 reports of child sexual exploitation and its Child
Victim Identification Program has reviewed and analyzed more than 27,030,500
child pornography images and videos. The organization works in cooperation
with the U.S. Department of Justice's office of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention. To learn more about NCMEC, call its toll-free,
24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit its web site at
www.missingkids.com.

MEDIA NOTE: Many of the family members participating in the training will be
available to be interviewed during the lunch break. Any media interested in
covering the Team HOPE training program or interviewing family members need to
contact the Public Relations Department at (703) 837-6111 or at
media@ncmec.org.

Participants in the training include family members of sixteen children who
are currently missing. Information about these sixteen cases is attached.
They include Non-family Abduction (NFA); Lost Injured and Missing (LIM);
International Family Abduction (IFA) and 5779 (A missing child between the age
of 18 and 21).

LIST OF FAMILIES OF MISSING CHILDREN WHO ARE PARTICIPATING TEAM HOPE TRAINING
ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2009







STATE VOLUNTEER NAME CHILD/ CASE CITY MISSING
CHILDREN'S TYPE DATE
NAMES

AL Stringfellow, Betty Sherry Lynn NFA New Brockton 6/6/1984
Marler
AR Nick, Colleen Morgan NFA Alma 6/9/1995
(Team Coordinator)
FL Leonard, Marilyn Clifton LIM Lakeland 8/22/1983
IL Teague, Kathy Vinyette NFA Chicago 6/25/1983
KS Clasen, Dee April Wiss LIM Wichita 1/11/2000
KY Cotton, Wanda Randy Sellers NFA Burlington 8/16/1980
NY Lyall, Doug and Mary Suzanne 5779 Ballston 3/2/1998
OH Culberson, Debbie Clarissa NFA Blanchester 8/28/1996
OH Schmidt, Pam Erica Baker NFA Kettering 2/7/1999
PA Murray, Lisa Jeffrey Lynn NFA Harrisburg 12/4/1985
(sibling)
Quebec Temperton, Melanie NFA Montreal 9/21/1988
Gwen Vatcher
TN Green, Donna Raymond NFA McLemoresville 11/6/1978
TX Saileanu, Tammy Isabella IFA Cedar Park 10/18/2001
Saileanu
WA Pichler, Kathy Joseph 5779 Bremerton 1/5/2005
WA Woody, Shawna Joseph NFA Tacoma 1/5/2005
Pichler (sibling)




NFA - Non Family Abduction - A child who is missing under circumstances
indicating that the disappearance is not voluntary and who has been abducted
by a non-family member.

LIM - Lost Injured and Missing - When a child's whereabouts are unknown to
the child's caretaker and the child is presumed to be lost or injured.
IFA - International Family Abduction - when a child is concealed or
transported out of the country by a family member with the intent to prevent
contact or deprive the other parent of custodial rights.

5779 - a missing child between the age of 18 and 21

CASE SUMMARY FOR SIXTEEN MISSING CHILDREN WHO HAVE FAMILY MEMBERS
PARTICIPATING IN TEAM HOPE TRAINING ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

-- Sherry Lynn Marler hasn't been seen since she was 12 years old in
1984. She went into the downtown area of New Brockton, AL with her
step-father. He went to the bank and Sherry went to the store.
Sherry
never returned to the truck where she was scheduled to meet her
step-father. (Sherry's mother, Betty Stringfellow, will participate
in the training).
-- Morgan Nick was abducted from a little league ball game by an
unidentified man on June 9, 1995, in Alma, AR. Morgan still missing,
turned 20 on September 19th, 2009 (Morgan's mother, Colleen Nick,
supervises a team of volunteers and will participate in the training).
-- Clifton Patrick Leonard went missing from Lakeland, FL when he was 16
years in 1967. Clifton had been diagnosed with teenage schizophrenia
before his disappearance. He disappeared after leaving a friends home
and may have met with foul play. (Clifton's mother, Marilyn
Leonard, will participate in the training).
-- Vinyette Teague was just two and a half years old when she went
missing
from Chicago, IL on June 25, 1983. She was last seen in the hallway
outside her apartment. Vinyette turned 26 this past June.
(Vinyette's mother Kathy Teague will participate in the training).
-- April Wiss was 16 years old when she went missing from Wichita, KS.
April's roommate woke the morning of January 11th( )2000 to find
April missing. Her purse and belongings were in the apartment, but
April had disappeared. (April's mother, Dorothy Clasen, will
participate in the training).
-- Randy Lee Sellers disappeared from Burlington, KY on August 16th, 1980
when he was 17 years old. Randy went to the Kenton County Fair with
his
friends that evening, and has not been seen since that night.
(Randy's mother, Wanda Cotton, will participate in the training).
-- Suzanne Lyall was a 19 year old college student and working part time
at
the local mall when she went missing in 1998 from Albany, NY. Suzanne
has not been seen since 3/2/1998 when she left work and went to the
bus
stop to return to her dormitory. (Suzanne's parents, Doug and Mary
Lyall, will participate in the training).
-- Clarissa Ann Culberson on August 28, 1996, at the age of 22 Clarissa
disappeared from her home. It is alleged that Clarissa met with foul
play. Her boyfriend was found guilty of her murder, but Clarissa's
body has not been found. (Clarissa's mother, Debbie Culberson, will
participate in the training).
-- Erica Baker was almost ten when she went missing from Kettering, Ohio
on
February 7, 1999. She was last seen between 3:00 and 3:30 p.m. when
she
left the house to walk her dog. The dog was later found, but Erica
has
not been seen since. Erica turned 20 this past June. (Erica's
grandmother Pam Schmidt will participate in this training).
-- Lynn Smith went missing from Hot Springs, AR in 1985 when she was 16
years old. She was last seen walking home from school. (Lynn's
sister, Lisa Murray, will participate in the training). -- Melanie Lynn Temperton was last seen on September 21, 1988 in
Mascouche,
Quebec, Canada when she was 20 years old. She phoned her mother to
say
she was staying at a friend's house the night. It is suspected that
Melanie met with foul play. (Melanie's mother, Gwen Vatcher
Temperton, will participate in the training).
-- Raymond Green was abducted by an unknown woman on November 6, 1978
from
Atlanta, Ga when he was 6 days old. The day Raymond went missing this
unknown woman came to the home, when there other people going in and
out. She took Raymond, walked out of the home and disappeared.
(Raymond's mother, Donna Green, will participate in the training).
-- Isabella Saileanu was abducted by her father in Rumania at the age of
2
on September 18, 2001. Isabella was living with her mother in Santa
Clara, CA prior to the abduction. (Isabella's mother, Tammy
Saileanu, will participate in the training).

-- Joseph Pichler a childhood actor went missing at the age of 18 on
January 5, 2006 from Bremerton, WA. His car was subsequently found
with
his cell phone and identification. Joseph remains missing.
(Joseph's mother, Kathy Pichler, and sister, Shawna Woody, will
participate in the training).



Contact:
Public Relations Department
(703) 837-6111
media@ncmec.org


/PRNewswire-USNewswire -- Sept. 22/

SOURCE National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Morgan age progressed to 2009
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Community Remembers Girl Who Vanished 15 Years Ago
POSTED: 9:09 pm CDT June 9, 2010
UPDATED: 10:51 pm CDT June 9, 2010
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Comments (0)ALMA, Ark. -- In 1995, 6-year-old Morgan Nick disappeared from an Alma Ballpark.

Alma police said she was playing with other children when she stopped to empty sand from her shoe. That was the last time anyone saw her.

Police have a sketch of a man they believe may have kidnapped Morgan but have not been able to find him.

For 15 years since the abduction Morgan's mother Colleen Nick said she has never given up hope.

"Until someone can prove to you that you should stop fighting for your child, you keep that hope out there everyday," Nick said.

Every year on the anniversary of Morgan's disappearance Nick said family and friends gather to release pink balloons into the sky. Nick said pink was her daughters favorite color.

Wednesday Nick gathered with family and friends for the anniversary on her front lawn at her Alma home.

Dozens of pink balloons floated into the sky.

"We hope that people will see the balloons, that the person who knows the truth will see the balloons, that somebody far away from here will find a balloon that recognizes Morgan," Nick said.

Tied to the balloons were cards with an aged progressed picture of what Morgan may look like today.

"We have had people in Indiana and Ohio find the balloons and call us and let us know that they got their media involved in their state," Nick said.

Nick said until her daughter comes home she'll continue to fight everyday.

"At the end of every day I can go to bed at night knowing I have done everything I can to find Morgan. Believing that I will be able to look her in the eye and say, I always knew I would find you." Nick said.
http://www.4029tv.com/mostpopular/23852666/detail.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.kfsm.com/news/kfsm-news-rv-morg...0,6181283.story

Family Marks 15 Years Since Morgan Nick's Disappearance
Kate Luck Reporter
9:52 PM CDT, June 9, 2010

June 9th is the 15 year anniversary of the day Morgan Nick was taken from an Alma ballpark.

Her family marked the occasion by releasing pink balloons with Morgan's story on them. It's been 15 years since the Nick family has heard Morgan's bubbly laugh and seen her bright smile. And they have never given up hope they'll see her again.

"I remember standing right there in that moment and thinking no matter what it took, I was going to find Morgan and I was going to bring her home. And I absolutely truly believe that I will look her in the eye someday and I will say "I always knew I would find you," said Nick.

The Alma Police Department has partnered with the Center for Missing and Exploited Children to copy Morgan's entire case file onto a database that will keep them organized and allow them to cross reference information. Volunteers have spent the past four months entering information, allowing investigators to give a fresh look at the case.

"It's a huge step. It will allow us to do things that 15 years ago were unthought-of. We couldn't even consider it," said Alma Police Chief Russell White.

"Somewhere in that case file is an answer. It's a matter of us finding it and getting it out there," said Nick.

"White says he hopes the database will help narrow down the information from the day Morgan was abducted from this ballpark and point them in a specific direction. But White says he believes a break in the case will happen when someone comes forward with new information.

"With all the technology that's important and are nice to have and will help us with the case. But it will probably be somebody giving us the information. So if you're that person, we urge you to call," said White.

The police department is getting leads weekly to Nick's case. Colleen says she believes one day those leads will lead her to her daughter.

"15 years later I'm ready to look Morgan in the eye and say "We've never given up on you. Not one time," said Nick.

If you have any information on this case, please call the Alma Police Department at 479-632-3333. Because of her daughter's abduction, Colleen Nick founded the Morgan Nick foundation, which has reunited hundreds of missing children with their families.
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Ell
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Cold case: Girl snatched at ballgame
U.S. / NEWS Wed Aug 18, 2010 @ 3:00pm neoform
CNN
93% Average Credibility In about the same time that it takes to light a match, tie a shoelace or hail a taxi, 6-year-old Morgan Nick vanished from her mother's sight.

Morgan was catching fireflies with other children in a baseball field parking lot in Alma, Arkansas, as a Little League game was winding down on the evening of June 9, 1995.

At first, Morgan, who was a bit shy, did not want to join the others as they tried to catch and release the glowing insects, said her mother, Colleen Nick.

But after a while, the kids persuaded Morgan to accompany them, and her mother gave permission, reluctantly, she now recalls. Morgan "threw her arms around my neck and gave me a big hug,'' Nick said.

"She kissed me on the cheek and then climbed out of the bleachers and ran to where the cars were parked, which was a little less than 50 yards from where we were. So we could see them running back and forth and playing.''

They chased fireflies for about 15 minutes. When her playmates came back to the field, Morgan wasn't with them. She was no nowhere in sight.

Her mother's panic set in quickly. Someone with a cell phone called 911 and police arrived to help search for Morgan. "We are still searching,'' Nick said in a recent interview slightly more than 15 years after her daughter disappeared on a warm summer night.

Police now believe Morgan was abducted by a stranger. The case has left an indelible mark on Arkansas.

The Morgan Nick Amber Alert System is one testament to her mother's activism and the imprint Morgan's disappearance has made.

"If I quit fighting for her, eventually everyone else will quit fighting for her, as well,'' Nick said.

After Morgan disappeared, Nick, who lived 30 miles east of Alma, took up residence for six weeks at a volunteer fire station next to the police department in Alma, a rural community of about 5,000.

"I was absolutely not going home without my daughter,'' she said.

These days, Nick speaks with a smile in her voice as she recalls Morgan's ''belly laugh that came from, you know, way down low.''

She loved cats, apples and thought bubble gum was a food group, Nick says. Morgan didn't like to run and play outside because it made her sweat.

In the first grade, Morgan brought home papers to sign up for track. Nick filled them out and sent them back to school. But after their first practice, Morgan quit. She was upset the running made her sweat.

Instead, she joined the Girl Scouts, where she could stay inside and "glue stuff,'' her mother said.

At six, Morgan's dream was to grow up and be a circus performer and a doctor, Nick said.

Morgan's younger brother is now in the Navy and her sister is a high school senior.

"Some days it's so hard to deal that the best I can do is sit on the couch and pull the covers up over my head," Nick said. "But at the end of the day, I know I have to get up and keep fighting for Morgan.''

One difficulty in solving the case is a lack of physical evidence and the fact that no one witnessed Morgan's abduction, said Chief Russell White of the Alma Police.

"What makes it a hard case to crack is that it's a real simple crime. It's not a conspiracy and does not involve a lot of people,'' White said.

"This is probably a person by nature who is a loner, had very few friends. He committed a crime and has not told anybody.''

Police have a room filled with documents recording thousands of leads that multiply more quickly than they can be checked and eliminated, White said.

Hundreds of potential persons of interest remain in the case files because their alibis or whereabouts at the time have not been fully established, he added.

White said investigators have pinned their hopes on apprehending an unidentified man who was at the game and who, according to witness accounts, made some sort of contact with Morgan.

A composite sketch shows a man with a scruffy beard, salt and pepper hair, standing about 6 feet and weighing 180 pounds. He had a red pickup truck, White said.

Details of his brief interaction with Morgan have not been disclosed because authorities need to screen out false confessions, White said.

An inmate in Indiana recently claimed responsibility, White said. But the inmate could not recall the specifics and his confession was dismissed.

When she disappeared, Morgan was approximately 4 feet tall and weighed about 55 pounds. She had blonde hair, blue eyes and five visible silver caps on her molars. She was wearing a green Girl Scout T-shirt, blue denim shorts and white tennis shoes.

A $60,000 reward is offered for information leading to a conviction or arrest in the case.If you have information on Morgan Nick, call the Alma Police Department at 1-479-632-3930 or The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-THE-LOST
http://www.newsique.com/us/cold_case_girl_snatched_at_ballg/
Ell

Only after the last tree has been
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NCIC Number: M-840041633
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Police in Alma are getting help from a two retired detectives who have signed on to take a fresh look at the 1995 disappearance of Morgan Nick.

Alma Police Chief Russell White told the Southwest Times Record that he has hired former New York City officer Robert Snow and former San Diego, Calif., sheriff's deputy John Tenwolde to review evidence and interview witnesses and possible suspects.

Morgan was 6 years old when she vanished from an Alma ballpark in June 1995. Her mother, Colleen Nick, went on to become an advocate for finding missing children and formed the Morgan Nick Foundation.

"These guys have a lot of experience and we trust them," White said. "I'm trying not to micro-manage them. I want them to do the case as they want to."

Snow and Tenwolde have more than 80 of law enforcement experience between them, the chief said.

Colleen Nick, who has said since her daughter has disappeared that she won't give up hope for her return, said she is optimistic the detectives may develop a significant lead.

"I believe they are a force to be reckoned with," she said.

Nick said the detectives have "gone all the way back to the very beginning, the very first day. They're re-looking at every piece of evidence, re-interviewing potential suspects."

White said the detectives were part of a larger team that went to Alma several times last year to try to crack the Morgan Nick case. They traveled as part of an investigative effort backed by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

White said the detectives suggested earlier this year that they be hired by the agency so they can devote themselves to the investigation. White says he's paying the investigators minimum wage. It is necessary to have the men on the payroll so they can have access to resources and work without the direct supervision that a guest at the department would be under.

"I thought it was a great idea," White said.

The officers had offered to do the work without pay.

"I hope they do solve it," he said. "It's a tough case."

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/6a8a...R--Morgan-Nick/
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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17th anniversary of Alma girl's disappearance
Posted: Jun 10, 2012 5:15 PM EDT
Updated: Jun 10, 2012 5:15 PM EDT
ALMA, Ark. (AP) - The mother of an Arkansas girl who disappeared 17 years ago says she remains hopeful that her daughter will someday be found.

Morgan Nick was 6 when she disappeared from a ballpark in Alma on the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line on June 8, 1995 - 17 years ago Saturday. Morgan Nick hasn't been seen since.

Her mother - Colleen Nick - told KHBS (http://bit.ly/LdcGNq) that she hangs on to the hope that she will someday see her daughter again.

Balloons were released on Saturday that included posters and information about Morgan.

Colleen Nick says miracles happen occasionally and that many missing children who are recovered are found because someone recognizes a photo of the child.


Information from: KHBS-TV, http://www.4029tv.com

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.katv.com/story/18750212/17th-an...s-disappearance
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/5cf5...ick-Anniversary
ALMA, Ark. — The mother of an Arkansas girl who disappeared 17 years ago says she remains hopeful that her daughter will someday be found.

Morgan Nick was 6 when she disappeared from a ballpark in Alma on the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line on June 8, 1995 — 17 years ago Saturday. Morgan Nick hasn't been seen since.

Her mother — Colleen Nick — told KHBS (http://bit.ly/LdcGNq) that she hangs on to the hope that she will someday see her daughter again.

Balloons were released on Saturday that included posters and information about Morgan.


Colleen Nick says miracles happen occasionally and that many missing children who are recovered are found because someone recognizes a photo of the child.
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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monkalup
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Family and friends gathered Saturday night for the 17th anniversary of Morgan Nick’s disappearance. Together, they released dozens of pink balloons into the night sky.

Each balloon had a card attached with Morgan’s picture and story.

“It’s a day of hope for us. We’re just hoping she comes home,” said Morgan’s aunt Bobbie Martin.

17 years ago, Morgan went to a little league game with her mother. She was wearing jean shorts, a green girl scout shirt and white tennis shoes.

Her mother, Colleen Nick, remembers when Morgan asked to go play with her friends and catch fireflies. But when Morgan’s friends returned, Morgan was missing. Her mother got up to immediately go look for Morgan where she last saw her: by her car emptying sand out of her shoes.

17 years later, Colleen Nick is still looking for Morgan. But she hasn’t given up hope that somewhere, Morgan’s out there.

Colleen Nick created the Morgan Nick Foundation in an effort to bring Morgan home. In addition, the foundation works to bring together parents and families of all missing children.

“It’s sad, just knowing that I have a sister out there that I don’t get to hang out with. But it’s good to hear about her and see the love that everyone had for her,” said Taryn Nick, Morgan’s sister.

As the pink balloons land, the Nick family hopes someone sees Morgan’s picture and can help bring her home.

“We continue to believe that Morgan’s going to come home. Until someone can prove to me that she’s not, then I believe she’s out there somewhere and is going to come home,” said Colleen Nick.

If you have information that you believe could help solve this case, call Crime Stoppers at (479) 78-CRIME.

http://5newsonline.com/2012/06/09/remembering-morgan-nick/
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.todaysthv.com/news/story.aspx?storyid=213707
Morgan Nick's disappearance 17 years ago still brings awareness to missing children
7:41 PM, Jun 9, 2012 | 0 comments

Facebook Twitter Google buzz Del.icio.us Digg Reddit Newsvine Buzz up! Fark it - A A A + Written by
Lauren Clark FILED UNDER

Morgan Nick

LITTLE ROCK, Ar (KTHV)--June 9 marks the 17th anniversary of the disappearance of Morgan Nick from a ballpark in Alma.

A child vanishes. A parent cries out.
A community reacts.
And a movement begins.
June 9,1995 the day Morgan Nick disappeared -- the day her mother recalls with vivid clarity. This is the 17th anniversary of her dissapearance and it's no different.

"Every year since Morgan has been, gone our family gathers to release pink balloons for Morgan as a visible sign of our hope and our celebration of her life. Once it gets dark we're going to catch fireflies. The day that Morgan was taken she was catching fireflies with her friends." says Morgan's mother Colleen.

A favorite childhood activity---which continues year after year--just like the search for the missing girl.

Colleen says, "There are more than 2,000 children reported missing every single day in the United States. It's very important to have communication with your children and family every day. There are predators on the internet and on our streets who--their purpose and their plan is to harm our children."

For every minute a child is missing, they can be moving another mile away from home. Lt. Jim Scott with the North Little Rock Police Department was one of the most vital voices in bringing the Morgan Nick Amber Alert System to the state.

He says,"We just made a drive out to Alma and visited with Colleen and she just kind of convicted Detective Shepherd and myself about doing the right thing and working harder to develop a plan for the state."

After a year-and-a-half of dedicated hours from statewide law enforcement the Arkansas State Police created the Morgan Nick Amber Alert System in 2000 -- one of the first in the nation.
Scott says, "It's not designed for runaway children, it's not designed for kids that may have been missing for several days. This is designed to bring the whole community together right then. To bring a very quick resolution to a situation where a child can't help themselves."

Just days after the state implemented the plan, it proved successful after a man carjacked a woman -- with a baby in the car. Thanks to the Morgan Nick Amber Alert on the radio -- a truck driver spotted the car and police safely rescued the baby.
Something Colleen Nick hopes will one day happen to her baby.
No matter how many days go by.
Colleen says, "I think that we can never be too careful to protect our kids and make sure that they're safe!"

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.todaysthv.com/news/article/2212...-Nicks-identity


Tonya Smith tries to get Morgan Nick's identity
3:50 PM, Aug 7, 2012 | 0 comments

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) -- A woman is under arrest for trying to gain documents to obtain missing girl Morgan Nick's identity.

Tonya Renee Smith, 24, of Hollister, Missouri, a Louisiana State Prison probation violator, has been arrested by Special Agents of the Arkansas State Police Criminal Investigation Division. Smith waived extradition and was brought to Arkansas earlier today.

Smith is being held in the Pulaski County Jail on a charge of felony computer fraud. Bond has been set at $200,000.

Police in Branson, Missouri located Smith last Thursday (August 2nd) after Arkansas State Police alerted local authorities that Smith may be in the Branson area. Since last week CID Special Agents have interviewed Smith and made arrangements to file a criminal charge and return her to Arkansas.

"The arrest of Smith would have likely gone without much public notice had it not been for the cooperative investigative work between the Arkansas Department of Health and Arkansas State Police," said Colonel JR Howard, Director of the Arkansas State Police.

On Saturday, June 23, 2012, a person identifying herself as Morgan Chauntel Nick placed an order through VitalCheck, an Internet based company which supplies certified copies of vital documents. Smith is alleged to have attempted to present herself as Morgan Nick seeking a certified birth certificate.

"Morgan Nick has not been forgotten," said Colonel Howard. "Our CID agents went to work and for almost thirty-six hours Arkansas State Troopers searched across three states for the person presenting herself as Morgan Nick."

Initially agents were uncertain what circumstances may have been associated with the VitalCheck request, specifically whether there was someone who believed she was Morgan Nick or whether someone was attempting to fraudulently capture Morgan Nick's identity.

Morgan was six-years-old when she was abducted from an Alma baseball park on June 9, 1995. The case remains unsolved and Arkansas State Police along with Alma Police officers continue to assign personnel to investigate new leads that occasionally come to the attention of the respective departments.
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