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NJF820715; July 15 1982 Princess Doe
Topic Started: Mar 14 2006, 01:47 PM (10,510 Views)
Gaelle
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It looks like this site is just starting:

http://princessdoe.org/

(picture sent to updates)
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
Glad to see they are doing this!
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Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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Pilgrim
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Gaelle,Mar 14
2006 - 01:47 PM
It looks like this site is just starting:

http://princessdoe.org/

(picture sent to updates)

This is the Person that got me involved with missing persons/doe/here. I overheard the last few minutes of a program on Satellite that was talking about this case and did a google which got me to the doenetwork.
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suzanne
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White Lilly
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Hi :)
I tried to get people to look into this.But I don't know if they did or not.I noticed on IDWANTED it says I believe a few teeth?front teeth?were discolored on princess Doe.Can anyone find out if this is true.It does not mention this anywhere else.It might make a big differene in identifying her.

suzanne
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suzanne
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White Lilly
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Hi

http://www.id-wanted.org/description.asp?caseNum=U-0127

suzanne
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Ell
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Heart of Gold
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http://id-wanted.org/description.asp?caseNum=U-0127
U-0127
Unidentified
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Description: White female, 15 to 19, 5'2'', 90 to 110 lbs., brown shoulder length hair, pierced ears with double pierced left. Two upper front teeth darker than others. Nail polish on right fingernails, none on left. Blood type O.

Victim found 7/15/82 in wooded area of Blairstown Cemetary, Route 94, Blairstown (Warren County), NJ, partially nude. Had worn red V-neck pullover shirt with yellow piping on front portion of shoulder, blue and black piping around neck, sleeves and waist. Wraparound skirt of red, white and blue print; wide border print of peacocks on lower area. Gold colored chain with small, evenly spaced white beads. 14-K gold cross of ornate design attached.

Skeletal, dental X-rays available.
Cause of Death: Blunt force head injury
Fingerprints:
22 M 4 U 000
L 6 U OIM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contact:
Blairstown Police Dept.
Stillwater Road Road - Box 128
Blairstown, NJ 07825
Tel: (201) 362-8266

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Ell

Only after the last tree has been
cut down;
Only after the last fish has been
caught;
Only after the last river has been
poisoned;
Only then will you realize
that money cannot be eaten.
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oldies4mari2004
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http://doenetwork.us/cases/36ufnj.html
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pdoe
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Ell,Jun 20
2006 - 06:13 PM
Posted Image
http://id-wanted.org/description.asp?caseNum=U-0127
U-0127
Unidentified


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Description: White female, 15 to 19, 5'2'', 90 to 110 lbs., brown shoulder length hair, pierced ears with double pierced left. Two upper front teeth darker than others. Nail polish on right fingernails, none on left. Blood type O.

Victim found 7/15/82 in wooded area of Blairstown Cemetary, Route 94, Blairstown (Warren County), NJ, partially nude. Had worn red V-neck pullover shirt with yellow piping on front portion of shoulder, blue and black piping around neck, sleeves and waist. Wraparound skirt of red, white and blue print; wide border print of peacocks on lower area. Gold colored chain with small, evenly spaced white beads. 14-K gold cross of ornate design attached.

Skeletal, dental X-rays available.

Cause of Death: Blunt force head injury


Fingerprints:
22 M 4 U 000
L 6 U OIM


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Contact:
Blairstown Police Dept.
Stillwater Road Road - Box 128
Blairstown, NJ 07825
Tel: (201) 362-8266

That is the first I have heard anything about the two teeth being darker. Give me a little time and I'll see what I can find out about that. The information posted there must be rather old based on two facts. First, the area code for the Blairstown police changed several years ago to 908 (10 years??) and the case is now handled by the Warren County Prosecutor's office and has been for quite a while. I'll let you know what I find out and post once I find it.

Thanks for the info.
Princess Doe Website
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
I will be very interested to hear what you come up with regarding the teeth. There are some missing girls with discolored front teeth...


# Unidentified White Female Located on July 15, 1982 in Blairstown, Warren County, New Jersey.
# Cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head.
# Estimated date of death is weeks before her discovery.
# Her nickname is Princess Doe

Vital Statistics

* Date of Birth: approximately 1964-1968
* Estimated age: 14 - 18 years old.
* Approximate Height and Weight: 5'2"-5'4"; 90-100 lbs.
* Distinguishing Characteristics: Brown, straight shoulder-length hair. Both of her ears were pierced; her left ear was double-pierced. She wore nail polish on her right fingernails only. No previous fractures.
* Dentals: Available. Lower anterior teeth are crowded. Her two front teeth are slightly darker than the rest of her teeth teeth were in fairly good condition. She had some work done, which indicates she probably belonged to a middle class family before she became estranged from them.
* DNA: MtDNA available in CODIS
* Clothing: The following items of clothing were found around the victim when she was discovered:
1. Red v-neck pullover shirt with yellow piping on the front portion of the shoulder area and blue and black piping around the neck, sleeves and waist;
2. Wraparound skirt with red, white and blue print with a wide border of peacock designs on the lower portion;
3. Gold-colored chain with small white beads and a 14-karat gold cross with an ornate design.

ShirtSkirtCrossCross2
Victim's Clothing and Accessories

Case History
The victim was discovered in a wooded area of at the north end of Cedar Ridge Cemetery on Route 94 in Blairstown, New Jersey. She was partially unclothed. She was severely beaten prior to her death.

Police believe Princess Doe was from the Long Island, NY. area, and was estranged from her family.
Her face had been bludgeoned beyond recognition. She was not pregnant when she died, and had never given birth. Toxicology results showed she was not using drugs at the time of her death -- but those results may have been tainted because investigators believe she was found several weeks after she died.

Investigators
If you have any information concerning this young woman's identity or the circumstances surrounding her death, please contact:
Warren County Prosecutor's Office
Sgt. Steve Speirs Jr.
908-475-6275
OR
New Jersey State Police
800-709-7090
All information may be submitted on an anonymous basis.

NCMEC #: NCMU400028

NCIC Number:
U-630870962
http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/36ufnj.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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pdoe
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So far, no luck with the teeth but I'll keep you posted if I learn something. Also, on a broader note and to give everybody an update:

The list of possible matches on the web site (http://www.princessdoe.org/) is being worked by LE and will be updated in the near future (within a few weeks.) So yes, progress is being made for sure. I'll keep the site updated whenever I receive information. Please feel free to post any suggestions for the site. I will check back here on a regular basis.
Princess Doe Website
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pdoe
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Just an FYI that some new ruleouts have been added to the website tonight. We are making progress!
Princess Doe Website
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
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That is great news. Every rule out just makes the list of possibilities smaller...and brings more attention to her case. Great job!
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
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an older article:


Mystery body dug up to conduct DNA tests

By JOHN TOMMASINO
Pocono Record Writer

BLAIRSTOWN, N.J. — The body of a murder victim was exhumed Wednesday 17 years after being dumped alongside a New Jersey cemetery about 15 minutes east of Stroudsburg.

Warren County Prosecutor John Laky said that new breakthroughs in DNA testing may finally reveal the identity of the girl known as Princess Doe.

The partially decomposed body of a girl estimated to be between 14 and 18 years old was found in July 1982 in Cedar Ridge Cemetery in Blairstown, N.J.

She was 5-foot-2 and 100 pounds with brown, shoulder-length hair. She had been dead five to 10 days, her face beaten beyond recognition. Police have never determined the girl's identity and no arrests were made.

Laky said that since the murder his department has received several profiles of missing persons matching Princess Doe's description.

"We've never been in a position to positively identify Princess Doe before. Various people have been suggested to us over the years.

"With the DNA testing that is available today we have a much stronger chance of identifying her," Laky said Wednesday from his office.

Samples of the victim's femur were sent to a DNA research center in Baltimore for testing Wednesday. The body was then buried again in the same grave.

The test results will be available to investigators in about one month.

Investigators have speculated that the victim was a runaway who worked in an Ocean City hotel.

The Princess Doe case drew international media attention and became a national symbol of missing persons cases. Her story became a 20-minute segment during a HBO special on bizarre crimes. The case was also the basis of a novel, "Death Among Strangers."

Her description was the first entry in the National Crime Information Center Missing Person's Computer Network on June 30, 1983, at FBI headquarters in Washington. She was the subject of a nationwide search that included the distribution of 20,000 flyers of a clay model facial reconstruction.

If the body is identified, prosecutors may be closer to determining who killed Princess Doe.

"Whenever you identify a victim, it puts you that much further down the road to finding a suspect," Laky said. "But I'm not going to say at this point that we're that much further yet."

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]

Princess Doe not forgotten

Seventeen years ago the body of a teen-age girl was found dumped on the outskirts of Blairstown, N.J., just a short drive from Delaware Water Gap.

Police said the girl, later dubbed "Princess Doe," had been beaten beyond recognition and that it would take some time to identify her.

Seventeen years later, we still do not know who she was, where she came from or who pummeled her to death. It bothers us to this day that exhaustive efforts yielded so little.

Now, breakthroughs in DNA testing bring new hope. On Wednesday New Jersey authorities exhumed her body, which is buried near the site off Route 94 where she was found. They extracted samples of a leg bone, which were sent to a DNA research center in Baltimore.

The Warren County Prosecutor's Office has received several profiles of missing persons matching Princess Doe's description. The DNA sampling may match one of those.

Once police know the girl's identity, they will have more to work with to track down the killer.

The Princess Doe case was reviewed by a group of international forensic experts, the subject of an HBO documentary, and received extensive media and police attention.

We hope the DNA sampling enables police to close this most harrowing case and bring the killer to justice.

Society, thankfully, has not forgotten a girl whose fate fell into the wrong hands.

Copyright © September 24, 1999, Pocono Record
Return to www.poconorecord.com


http://www.vidocq.org/doe/doe1.html

Princess Doe: Dead among strangers
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
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http://z13.invisionfree.com/PorchlightUSA/...opic=2292&st=0&
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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pdoe
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Yesterday I had to travel to NJ and had the opportunity to visit the grave site again. People in the town keep the site very neat. There was a fresh arrangement consisting of flowers and a holiday wreath. Just a reminder that this case is solvable. Happy New Year!
Princess Doe Website
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pdoe
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One other update, the front two teeth were slightly discolored compared to the rest of the teeth. That has been confirmed.
Princess Doe Website
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pdoe
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Please visit the newly posted information on America's Most Wanted!

http://www.amw.com/missing_children/case.cfm?id=44823

This is the first new info in a while and very, very interesting!
Princess Doe Website
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Cheryl
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http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/in...7596&st=0&#last


Has she been ruled out as Lori Lloyd?

Cheryl
Tarot Canada

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"The Queen of Cups"
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Cheryl
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Lori Lloyd
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Ell
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Heart of Gold
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http://www.vidocq.org/doe/doe2.html

Policeman haunted by killer's presence
By DAN BURNETT
Pocono Record Day Editor
By his own admission, former Blairstown, N.J., police lieutenant Eric Kranz became obsessed and then frustrated with the Princess Doe case. Kranz, who in 1982 was second in command at the small but spirited police department, headed up the investigation of the murdered teen.
To this day, Kranz said he thinks he spoke to the teen's killer at the cemetery where she was found. But others involved in the investigation — state police and the Warren County Prosecutor's Office — did not want to interrogate the suspect until the girl was identified, he said.

Princess Doe, an unidentified teen between 14 and 18 years old, was dumped in a ravine off Route 94 in the small New Jersey community just 15 minutes from Stroudsburg in July 1982. Despite the case still being open to this day, authorities do not know who the girl is or how she ended up bludgeoned beyond recognition in rural northern New Jersey.

Kranz, who worked day and night on the case in its early years, said he met the suspect shortly after the girl was buried in January 1983. Citizens reported seeing him several times at her grave so Kranz went to the cemetery to see him.

The man, who lived nearby, turned out to have a record of violence, being arrested for fighting with police and assaulting at least one family member before he moved to Blairstown. He traveled in his line of work, and he quite likely passed through Maryland — the girl's last known location before she died — at the time of her death, Kranz said.

Kranz said he also spoke to his suspect's brother during the course of the investigation, who told the then-police lieutenant that his brother had the capacity to commit such a brutal crime.

Kranz said he found no physical evidence linking the suspect to the crime, but the suspect sold his vehicle —which Kranz theorized was used to transport the murder victim — to an out-of-state party shortly after the girl's body was found. Kranz said he went to New York to search the vehicle, but was not able to get access to it.

Kranz said the prosecutor at the time, Howard McGinn, told him not to interrogate the suspect until the girl was identified.

"I have a very strong suspicion he is the killer,'' Kranz said. "I am the only one on God's green earth who really thought the guy did it, and I was never given the opportunity to pursue that the way I thought it should be done. . . . .This thing could have been solved years ago, but I didn't have it in me to pursue it anymore.''

Frustrated with his constant run-ins with other investigators assigned to the case by the New Jersey State Police, Kranz resigned from the township department in 1985. He is now disabled, recovering from a back injury.

Kranz said his suspect moved from Blairstown in the past decade. He does not know where the man lives now.


Different account
McGinn, who was Warren County's prosecutor from 1981-86, said he does not remember Kranz having a suspect he wanted to interrogate.
"I don't recall anything like that at all,'' said McGinn, who now has a private civil practice in Warren County. "That doesn't ring a bell.''

The state police investigators who worked on the case with Kranz have retired and left the area. They could not be reached for comment.

But McGinn did say that the focus of the case from the outset was to find out who the victim was.

"Because we couldn't positively identify her, we couldn't do much else until that was done. Once we had an ID, then we could have focused on who did it,'' said McGinn, who added that he was satisfied with Kranz's handling of the investigation.

When told of Kranz's assertion there is a viable suspect, current Warren Prosecutor John J. O'Reilly said: "This case has been investigated extensively by my office and the state police. That's all I can really say about it. We pursued every lead we had.''

O'Reilly said he thought someone from his office had been in touch with Kranz, but Kranz said no law enforcement officers consulted with him since he left the police department 12 years ago.

Kranz said the state police investigators did not get involved in the case for months, primarily because they knew it would be difficult to solve. When they did join the investigation, he and they butted heads frequently because the state police were constantly criticizing his procedures.

Kranz called it an "embarrassment'' that a case requiring so much paperwork and legwork only had one township detective working on it in its early months until the state police answered his nine-man department's plea for help.

Former prosecutor McGinn agreed there was not enough manpower in the case's early stages.

"We were concerned about getting sufficient personnel on the case. Blairstown Police Department was small at the time, and of course our office was small at the time, too. But at some point the state police did get involved. I can't recall the timeline anymore after all these years,'' McGinn said.


Obsessed with case
Kranz said he became obsessed with Princess Doe because of the enormity of the workload and brutality of the crime. He labeled as a "failure'' the case's first mission: To determine the identity of the girl whose head was bludgeoned beyond recognition and whose body was then dumped in a ravine off Route 94 during a mid-July heat wave in 1982. After that, find the killer.
Once word was out that the battered corpse had been found near a cemetery on July 15, 1982, hundreds of calls poured into the small police station, from parents whose children had run away, from police officers from other jurisdictions checking on missing persons and from cranks and tipsters. Scores of psychics called, offering their services, but were turned down, Kranz said.

Also, Kranz examined hundreds of missing person and forensic reports in an effort to identify her.

"I'm almost sure she passed through my work, but for the most ridiculous reason I did not recognize her,'' he said.

For example, forensic reports told him that the corpse had no broken bones, so missing-person reports where the victims had once had broken bones were ruled out automatically.

Then, Kranz said, he learned that some young people's bones mend in such a way that it is nearly impossible to tell that they were once broken. Hence, he said, some of the missing-person reports may had been valuable after all.

"At times I was going through the trash can trying to backtrack,'' he said.


Use of media
The strategy from the outset was to keep the case in the media. Kranz named the girl "Princess Doe'' so that she would have some sort of identity and "a personality to keep her in the press.'' A forensic artist from Philadelphia was recruited to reconstruct her appearance in the form of a bust so that it could be photographed to make posters and fliers.
The plan worked. Papers large and small ran stories on the bizarre case, TV crews covered press conferences and an HBO special on strange crimes did a 20-minute segment on it. The show aired nationally and generated many calls from parents who children had run away, but no significant leads materialized, he said.

A novel, "Death Among Strangers,'' used the case as a backdrop.

"I can't for the life of me understand how a life can be erased without anyone coming forward who has some idea who she was,'' said Kranz.

The Warren County Prosecutor's Office, which has since taken over the case, determined three months ago that the girl was likely a runaway last living and working as a maid in Ocean City, Md. But investigators still do not know who she was or how she ended up dead in rural northwestern New Jersey.

With the case taking a toll on Kranz's personal life, in 1985 he resigned to become executive director of the Foundation to Find and Protect Children, a lobby and investigative non-profit agency that helped parents find their runaway children. The job ended a year later when funding dried up.

Since then Kranz said he has had a variety of jobs. "Whatever I had to do to make a living, I did,'' he said. He left Blairstown shortly after resigning from the police department, and he has maintained no ties. He will say only that he now lives in northern New Jersey.

"I was so burned out after that case," he said. "It was enough to exasperate anyone.''



Ell

Only after the last tree has been
cut down;
Only after the last fish has been
caught;
Only after the last river has been
poisoned;
Only then will you realize
that money cannot be eaten.
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Ell
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Heart of Gold
[ *  *  * ]
Princess Doe: Dead among strangers
A 1982 murder remains unsolved, but not forgotten

John J. O'Reilly, Warren County prosecutor, poses with an artist's model of Princess Doe.
David W. Coulter/Pocono Record

By DAN BURNETT
Pocono Record Day Editor
When Princess Diana met her fate three months ago, thoughts of another tragic victim, Princess Doe, came to mind.
Unlike her more famous counterpart, Princess Doe was likely near the bottom rung of the socio-economic ladder. She was a white teen-ager — a runaway in all likelihood, according to authorities — whose face was beaten beyond recognition in July 1982. Her body was then dumped alongside a cemetery on Route 94 in Blairstown, N.J., a speck of a town just 15 minutes east of Stroudsburg.

Despite countless attempts to identify her — including a 20-minute spot on an HBO crime special that aired in 1983 — authorities know little more about the murder victim than they did 15 years ago: She was between 14 and 18 years old and was wearing a red V-neck pullover, a red, white and blue print wraparound skirt and a gold chain with tiny white beads and a 14-karat gold cross.

Authorities also know that somebody was very angry at the girl, angry enough to bludgeon her face beyond recognition with a blunt object. Who that person is and the murder weapon have never been determined.

Police sources have said it is very rare that a murder victim, particularly one who is so young, is still unidentified 15 years later.

The case is old, but not forgotten. As recently as September the Warren County, N.J., Prosecutor's Office learned that the young woman likely was working in the tourist town of Ocean City, Md., from 1979 to 1982 as a hotel housekeeper. Presumed by police to be a runaway, she used several aliases, investigators have learned.

This month — 15 years after the community of Blairstown buried the girl near the lonely spot where her battered body was dumped — Princess Doe made headlines again, this time in theNew York Times .

A prestigious group of current and former federal agents, former prosecutors and forensic specialists from around the world called the Vidocq Society met recently in Philadelphia to discuss the case.

The private group is named after a 19th-century French detective credited with introducing the use of scientific tools and extensive record-keeping into police work. The elite group brainstorms on cold murder cases, sometimes offering insight that those who had investigated may have overlooked. The society has been credited with helping police throughout the country solve several cases.

Frank Bender, a Philadelphia artist and forensic sculptor who made a bust of Princess Doe to help police put a face on the victim, is one of the founders of the prestigious group that boasts 82 original members and 100 special members. He and at least one other member had worked on the Princess Doe case, and it was their interest that brought it the attention of the society.

Vidocq spokesman Dick Lavinthal, who works as a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Department of Justice, said the society provides professional investigators with a "cadre of law enforcement and forensic experts at no cost.''

The society meets bi-monthly in Philadelphia to discuss cases, and several members typically will form an ad-hoc committee to pursue cases they think they can help on, he said.

Because the Princess Doe case is active, Lavinthal said he could not comment specifically on what other avenues were being pursued. Any fruitful information, he said, would be turned over to the Warren County, N.J., Prosecutor's Office, which is following up on new leads.

Present at the Vidocq meeting was Warren County Prosecutor John J. O'Reilly, who was in Philadelphia to see if this group of experts could help his office develop any information.

O'Reilly said members helped him with profiles of what the killer could be like. He is hopeful that someone in the society may turn up a substantial lead.

The case, O'Reilly said, has been particularly difficult because authorities still do not know the identity of the girl.

"It is a very troubling thing that there are kids who are runaways, and no one bothers to report them as missing. As a result, there's no record that these kids are out there somewhere.''

While O'Reilly and his detectives continue their footwork, the gravestone marking the girl's plot serves as a grim reminder of the perplexing case:

Princess Doe:
Missing From Home
Dead Among Strangers
Remembered By All
Born ? — Found July 15, 1982
http://www.vidocq.org/doe/doe1.html
Ell

Only after the last tree has been
cut down;
Only after the last fish has been
caught;
Only after the last river has been
poisoned;
Only then will you realize
that money cannot be eaten.
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Ell
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Heart of Gold
[ *  *  * ]
Investigators study possible Maryland connection
Princess Doe may have worked in shore town
By DAN BURNETT
Pocono Record Day Editor


In September, detectives from the Warren County, N.J,. Prosecutor's Office held a press conference on the Princess Doe case, not in Blairstown or the county seat of Belvidere, but 230 miles from their office in Ocean City, Md.
One detective, Bill Eppell, told the local Maryland media gathered in the police station in that seashore town that a $1,000 reward was being offered for information leading to the identification of a young murder victim who worked in Ocean City from 1979-82.

Although the victim has been named Princess Doe shortly after her battered body was found dumped in a ravine in Blairstown, N.J,. in July 1982, the detectives never used that term. Through the years, the case has received international coverage, including a 20-minute spot on an HBO crime special in 1983.

Detective Eppell, according to the Ocean City Today weekly newspaper, was paraphrased as saying "investigators believe she was in Ocean City during the years 1979 to 1982. They believe she worked in housekeeping at the Harrison Hall (hotel) during the summers of 1980 and 1981 and might have stayed in the North Division Street Area near the foot of the Route 50 bridge.''

The article also said that when the detectives from New Jersey were tracking down leads in July canvassing Ocean City hotels, they found six people who had information about the victim.

But in an interview last week, Eppell's boss, Warren Prosecutor John J. O'Reilly, said his office has not determined yet that the victim, believed to be between 14 and 18 years old, was living in Ocean City, Md. He said his office has not ruled it out either.

O'Reilly said the reporter who wrote the story "misconstrued what the detective said'' when she wrote her story. He would not comment further on specific information on this aspect of the case, nor would he say what evidence led his detectives to Ocean City.



Story accurate, reporter says
When told of the prosecutor's statement, the reporter said she stood by her work and that she was always willing to cooperate with police. She had no other comment.
Detective Eppell, who is on vacation, was not available for comment last week, and his partner on this case, Detective Susan Bloodgood, said office policy dictates all information would have to come from Prosecutor O'Reilly.

Jay Hancock, public relations officer for the 100-officer Ocean City Police Department, said the New Jersey reward is still being offered. As of Thanksgiving, he said three or four tips have been forwarded to Warren County. He did not know if any of the tips were helpful to New Jersey authorities.

Other than assisting Warren County detectives when asked, his department does not have an active role in the Princess Doe case since the girl was murdered in New Jersey, Hancock said.

"From what I recall, they were pretty sure the girl who had worked down here was the same girl who was found in New Jersey,'' Hancock said.

The girl's identity — a key to finding her killer — has eluded authorities for more than 15 years.

Hancock said Harrison Hall, where the teen is believed to have worked, is a large hotel on the boardwalk, and North Division Street where she is suspected of living has more modest rental properties that appeal to seasonal workers.

If authorities are closer to learning who the girl was, they are not saying.



Leads pursued
Prosecutor O'Reilly said that many leads have been followed up on, especially in cases where mass murderers have targeted young women. When cases like that enter the limelight, O'Reilly said his detectives look into it to see if the killer's timeline could have crossed paths with Princess Doe. To date, no solid evidence has emerged from the legwork, he said.
O'Reilly said he did not know if the murder victim's identity would ever be learned, but he said his office would follow up on every viable lead.

"It's very painstaking work, there's no question about that. But sometimes you do get lucky,'' he said.

http://www.vidocq.org/doe/doe3.html
Ell

Only after the last tree has been
cut down;
Only after the last fish has been
caught;
Only after the last river has been
poisoned;
Only then will you realize
that money cannot be eaten.
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Ell
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Heart of Gold
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Princess Doe Timeline
JULY 1982: Teen's body found in ravine on Route 94 near a Blairstown, N.J., cemetery. Her face was beaten beyond recognition.


OCTOBER 1982: A Philadelphia forensic artist makes a bust of the girl's face.


JANUARY 1983: Blairstown officials bury the girl in the cemetery where she was found.


JUNE 1983: HBO airs a 20-minute spot on the case to an international audience.


MARCH 1985: Blairstown Police Lt. Eric Kranz, the chief investigator on the case, resigns from the department. He never works in law enforcement again.


JULY 1997: Warren County, N.J., detectives go to Ocean City, Md. and interview six people who had information about the victim, a runaway.


SEPTEMBER 1997: Warren County detectives post a $1,000 reward in Ocean City for information about the still unidentified victim.


NOVEMBER 1997: The Vidocq Society, a prestigious group of international crime experts, agree to re-examine the Princess Doe case.


DEC. 16, 1997: The victim is still not identified and her killer is still free.

http://www.vidocq.org/doe/doe4.html
Ell

Only after the last tree has been
cut down;
Only after the last fish has been
caught;
Only after the last river has been
poisoned;
Only then will you realize
that money cannot be eaten.
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pdoe
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There will be a memorial service for Princess Doe at the gravesite at 12:00pm on Sunday, July 15th, 2007. The details have been posted on the website. Please join us if you live in the area. Thank you!

http://princessdoe.org/memorial.html
Princess Doe Website
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burnsjl2003
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A quarter-century later, a lovely Princess still unknown
Teen killed in 1982 and found in Blairstown remains unidentified
Monday, July 16, 2007
BY RALPH R. ORTEGA
Star-Ledger Staff

They've known her for 25 years, but she's still a stranger.

The girl whose crumpled, bludgeoned body was discovered near a Blairstown cemetery on July 15, 1982, remains "Princess Doe" -- a name detectives thought was better than Jane, but that, even now, they refuse to settle for.

The prospect that someone will come forward with the girl's identity is what continues to drive people like Eric Kranz, the former Blairstown police officer who came up with the nickname and once held seances at her grave in hopes her spirit would help solve the murder. Like Annemarie Latimer, who tried hypnosis to dredge up recollections for investigators, and Peggy Goble, who sees parallels in the murder of her sister.

On the 25th anniversary of the body's discovery yesterday, the hope of resolution brought them back to the same cemetery, as a crowd of about 80 mourners clustered around Princess Doe's grave and renewed their pledge.

"We will ask once again, for all those who hear this plea, to rededicate themselves," said Kranz, now retired but still assisting with the case. "When we find out who she is, her family will be forever grateful."

Some who attended the brief service had personal connections to the case. Others were simply haunted by the murder that gripped the small Warren County town and rippled far beyond it.

"How could this happen to this unlived life?" Kranz said. "Not in Blairstown. Not in America."

Found by maintenance workers in Blairstown's Cedar Ridge Cemetery along Route 94, the girl's body was beaten beyond recognition and left without identification -- placing her in the "Jane Doe" category reserved for unidentified victims. Kranz, who called his daughter "princess," passed along the title to the victim to prevent her from slipping into obscurity.

It worked, as Princess Doe captivated international attention, becoming a symbol of missing children and serving as a catalyst for legislation for the fingerprinting of children. She was the first entry into the FBI's new national computer database of missing persons in the early 1980s. Her facial image, recreated by a forensic artist, went on to appear on milk cartons across the United States.

Her case continues to be detailed online at www.princessdoe.org, a Web site run by a Maryland man who was a 4-year-old boy in Blairstown at the time of the murder. Struck by the gruesome discovery, Travis Riggs, now 29, maintains the site to provide updates and answers to questions, information about possible matches who have been ruled out and a place to provide tips on the case.

But the publicity hasn't produced an answer, and the questions continue to gnaw.

"What upsets me more than anything is that nobody cared," said Galina Seidel, who attended the service yesterday. "She had to have somebody, even somebody who hated her."

Latimer, who said she saw the girl at a supermarket two days before her body was found, went to a hypnotist in hope of jogging her memory.

"I've just not been able to understand how they couldn't solve it," Latimer said.

They once thought they had.

At one point in the early 1980s, State Police and the Warren County Prosecutor's Office held a joint news conference announcing they had identified Princess Doe. But Kranz immediately discounted that report, saying the suspected runaway from California they named had been ruled out early in Kranz's investigation by a forensic expert who compared dental records and found no match.

In 1999, authorities exhumed the girl's body and used DNA from her remains to cross-reference lists of missing girls, but again didn't find a match, said Lt. Stephen Speirs of the prosecutor's office, the lead investigator in the murder.

Other theories persist.

The most popular pegs Princess Doe as a runaway, between 14 and 18 years old, from either Long Island or Maryland. Another, posted on the Web site of the television show "America's Most Wanted," tells of a New York pimp whose prostitute told police he beat a teen to death in a New Jersey cemetery. According to the Web site, the pimp accepted responsibility for Princess Doe's murder in a 2005 letter, but no charges were ever filed.

Authorities have declined to comment on the theories, and neither Speirs nor Kranz would comment on the investigation yesterday. But Kranz said "DNA is crucial," and that investigators are "very close" to learning Princess Doe's identity.

It can't happen soon enough for Goble, whose sister was murdered in 1987. After the death, she consulted a psychic, whose description of the killer had some investigators convinced it was the same person who had attacked Princess Doe. But though her sister's killer was charged and convicted, he has not been charged in connection with Princess Doe, Goble said.

A death like her sister's or Princess Doe's "leaves a hole in your heart," she said.

"It's just something that never leaves you."

Staff writers Claire Heininger, Joseph Fisher and Jonathan Casiano contributed to this report. Ralph R. Ortega may be reached at rortega@starledger.com or (908) 429-9925.

http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/b...7380.xml&coll=1
Lisa

“Thou shalt not be a victim.
Thou shalt not be a perpetrator.
Above all, thou shalt not be a bystander.”

(On a plaque at the Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C.)
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Ell
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25 years after her death, legend of 'Princess Doe' lives on
By SARA JEROME
For the Pocono Record
July 22, 2007


Last Sunday morning, more than 90 people showed up at Cedar Ridge Cemetery in Blairstown, N.J., to mourn the death of a girl they never knew.

They were there to memorialize Princess Doe, the mysterious protagonist of childhood campfire stories, the ill-fated centerpiece of local mothers' warning tales, the murder victim that shook the quiet town 25 years ago when her body was found in the same cemetery where she is now buried.

Still the focus of an active cold case, the victim, who died of blunt force trauma to the head, has never been identified.

The question of this girl's identity filled the minds and conversations of those who attended a memorial service at her grave site last Sunday. But another question could be asked about those who turned up for the unusual ceremony: Who would be so moved or mesmerized by the murder of a stranger that they would flock to honor the little they knew of her life and her death?

Some came out of sheer curiosity.

Blairstown resident Jackie Benson said she didn't live in the town at the time of the murder, but saw the case on a psychic detective show.

HBO, Weird New Jersey magazine, Web sites, and a mystery novel have all featured this case over the years.

"I was interested in the updates, the particulars," Benson said.

Like Benson, many of the younger people in attendance didn't remember the event itself — they only knew of Princess Doe from her royal position in the hierarchy of local lore.

"My neighbors told me about her when I moved to town," said Sue Vitovic, a Hardwick resident.

Princess Doe's story endures, she said, because it's alarming for a tragedy like this to surface in such a small town.

"Especially back then, it was like a ghost town," Vitovic said. "It grabs your attention."

That's a key reason the case is still pursued at all, according to Lt. Stephen Speirs of the Warren County Prosecutor's Office who is working on this cold case and three others. Law enforcement grants this case — which Speirs said is pursued "actively, daily" — more attention than other cold-case murders because "there's so much public interest."

"There was a human factor that was attached to this case because it's in this small town," said Speirs, who attended the memorial. "People couldn't help but get somewhat of an emotional attachment."

Speirs wasn't surprised that so many people showed up. The event organizer, Travis Riggs, who grew up in Blairstown and now lives in Maryland, put a lot of effort into publicizing the memorial service.

Riggs said he expected to attract curious onlookers. After all, spending four to six hours per week managing a Web site about Princess Doe's death, he admits to being one himself.

Though Speirs said law enforcement appreciates the Princess Doe Web site, Riggs admitted that friends sometimes question his "hobby."

"They give me a hard time," said Riggs, who was four years old at the time of the murder. "My family is supportive, though."

Yet if tracking the story of a dead girl is an unusual pastime, this wasn't apparent last Sunday. Riggs was treated like a hero in the confined reality of the memorial service, where thank-yous were a welcome break from the raised eyebrows that his hobby usually attracts, he said.

While Riggs attested to a fascination with the forensic aspects of this case, for others, the allure of Princess Doe's tale was the gruesomeness of the unsolved murder. It seemed that some had flocked to the memorial out of some prurient desire to engage with the macabre.

Daniel Mikulin came out because he likes to "read the mysteries" and the case of Princess Doe reminds him of one of those.

"It's a horror story," Mikulin said, speculating on rumors about the murder. "They say a pimp beat her face in."

Pastor David Harvey of Blairstown's First Presbyterian Church, who spoke at the ceremony, said it was normal for an unsolved case like this one to attract the attention of many kinds of people.

"I think there are a variety of reasons that draw us to something like this," he said. "We're curiously drawn to the dead."

Retired Lt. Eric Krantz, the first investigator to work on the case and gave the victim her alias "Princess Doe," is confident the case will be solved as long as the case stays in the public eye. Krantz, who has worked the case everyday for the past 25 years, said it is not the murderer or even the force of time eroding his leads.

"The mountain is 'out of site, out of mind,'" he said. "It's when people don't see the importance. We have to say, this life of this girl is so important."
http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/.../NEWS/707220350
Ell

Only after the last tree has been
cut down;
Only after the last fish has been
caught;
Only after the last river has been
poisoned;
Only then will you realize
that money cannot be eaten.
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pdoe
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Still waiting for more DNA ruleouts. Hoping to have updates by the end of 2007.
Princess Doe Website
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pdoe
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Today, July 15th, 2008 marks the 26th anniversary of the discovery of Princess Doe. She is still in our thoughts and prayers.
Princess Doe Website
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mimi
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Office of the Sheriff
Camden County, New Jersey

Missing Persons Unit
UNIDENTIFIED BODY
Reconstructed Images
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Unidentified Caucasian Female Located on July 15, 1982 in Blairstown, New Jersey Approximately 14 - 18 years old by coroner's estimation. (Born around 1968) Cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head. Her nickname is Princess Doe.

Vital Statistics
The victim was 5'2 and weighed 100 -120 pounds. She had straight brown, shoulder-length hair. Both of her ears were pierced; her left ear was double-pierced. She wore nail polish on her right fingernails only. She has been nicknamed Princess Doe. The following items of clothing were found around the victim when she was discovered:

Red v-neck pullover shirt with yellow piping on the front portion of the shoulder area and blue and black piping around the neck, sleeves and waist;
Wrap-around skirt with red, white and blue print with a wide border of peacock designs on the lower portion;
Gold-colored chain with small white beads and a 14-karat gold cross with an ornate design.
The victim was discovered in a wooded area of Blairstown Cemetery on Route 94 in Blairstown, New Jersey. She was partially unclothed. Death is estimated to have occurred up to one week prior to discovery of her body. She was severely beaten prior to her death.
Investigators have learned that the victim may have been a runaway. She may have worked as a hotel housekeeper in Ocean City, Maryland from 1979 - 1982. The unidentified runaway who worked at the hotel matched Princess Doe's description. The worker used several aliases while employed. Maryland is the last known locale of the unidentified girl.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Investigators
If you have any information concerning this young woman's identity or
the circumstances surrounding her death, please contact:
New Jersey State Police
609-882-2000
All information may be submitted on an anonymous basis.

Source Information:
Source Information: The Missing Children...HELP Center
APB On-Line

http://www.co.camden.nj.us/sheriff/Missing...eBlairstown.htm
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
Posted Image
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
# Unidentified White Female Located on July 15, 1982 in Blairstown, Warren County, New Jersey.
# Cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head.
# Estimated date of death is weeks before her discovery.
# Her nickname is Princess Doe

Vital Statistics

* Date of Birth: approximately 1964-1968
* Estimated age: 14 - 18 years old.
* Approximate Height and Weight: 5'2"-5'4"; 90-100 lbs.
* Distinguishing Characteristics: Brown, straight shoulder-length hair. Both of her ears were pierced; her left ear was double-pierced. She wore nail polish on her right fingernails only. No previous fractures.
* Dentals: Available. Lower anterior teeth are crowded. Her two front teeth are slightly darker than the rest of her teeth teeth were in fairly good condition. She had some work done, which indicates she probably belonged to a middle class family before she became estranged from them.
* DNA: MtDNA available in CODIS
* Clothing: The following items of clothing were found around the victim when she was discovered:
1. Red v-neck pullover shirt with yellow piping on the front portion of the shoulder area and blue and black piping around the neck, sleeves and waist;
2. Wraparound skirt with red, white and blue print with a wide border of peacock designs on the lower portion;
3. Gold-colored chain with small white beads and a 14-karat gold cross with an ornate design.

ShirtSkirtCrossCross2
Victim's Clothing and Accessories

Case History
The victim was discovered in a wooded area of at the north end of Cedar Ridge Cemetery on Route 94 in Blairstown, New Jersey. She was partially unclothed. She was severely beaten prior to her death.

Police believe Princess Doe was from the Long Island, NY. area, and was estranged from her family.
Her face had been bludgeoned beyond recognition. She was not pregnant when she died, and had never given birth. Toxicology results showed she was not using drugs at the time of her death -- but those results may have been tainted because investigators believe she was found several weeks after she died.

Investigators
If you have any information concerning this young woman's identity or the circumstances surrounding her death, please contact:
Warren County Prosecutor's Office
Sgt. Steve Speirs Jr.
908-475-6275
OR
New Jersey State Police
800-709-7090
All information may be submitted on an anonymous basis.

NCMEC #: NCMU400028

NCIC Number:
U-630870962
http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/36ufnj.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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gingerszabo21
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Has this one been ruled out?

http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/2966dfde.html
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tatertot
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http://www.njherald.com/story/19019225/inv...ss-doe-ceremony

Investigators to reveal new information at Princess Doe ceremony
Posted: Jul 13, 2012 11:45 AM EDT Updated: Jul 13, 2012 11:59 AM EDT
By LYNDSAY CAYETANA BOUCHAL

BLAIRSTOWN—Investigators will reveal new information about "Princess Doe" 30 years after the unidentified teen girl was beaten to death and left in Cedar Ridge Cemetery.

The Warren County Prosecutor's Office in conjunction with several missing children organizations and private citizens will offer a nondenominational memorial service for the girl, where the information will be released. The public ceremony will take place at Cedar Ridge Cemetery, where Princess Doe was buried, Sunday at noon.

The Warren County Prosecutor's Office Cold Case Unit and other law enforcement agencies have continued to work to reexamine evidence in the investigation which they believe will help lead to the identity of Princess Doe and the person or persons responsible for her murder. The prosecutor's office will also discuss the advanced techniques they are utilizing to solve this case.

The body of Princess Doe was discovered by cemetery maintenance workers the morning of July 15, 1982, on the southeast corner of the cemetery, just over a steep bank that leads down to a creek, according to a website devoted to the case.

The girl, who was likely between 14 and 18 years old, died of blunt-force trauma to the head, according to the website, which said no weapon was found. The type of weapon could not be determined.

She was about 5 feet, 2 inches tall, weighed about 110 pounds, with medium brown to her shoulders. Both her ears were pierced, the left ear twice. Princess Doe was found partially clothed in a simple peasant skirt, a red short-sleeved shirt with yellow piping and a 14-karat gold necklace with a cross on it.

The victim was found with red nail polish only on her right hand. She had no known surgical scars, birth marks or tattoos, although scars or marks on the head or face area are unknown due to the condition of the body. According to the website, no conclusive evidence of sexual assault was found, but this was difficult to determine because of the exposure of the body. Additionally, the victim was neither pregnant nor had ever given birth.

Toxicology reports did not reveal any traces of drugs. The results are not 100 percent conclusive because of the time lapse between the death and discovery of the body, which is believed to have been found one to three weeks after she died.

Princess Doe was laid to rest on Jan. 22, 1983, in a grave not far from where her body was found.

In the months following her burial, the case became subject to national media attention and was featured on an HBO special. Princess Doe became the first unidentified person case entered into the National Crime Information Center database by former FBI Director William Webster in 1983.

In 1999, the girl's body was exhumed for DNA samples.

In 2007, a memorial service was held for the teen. Nearly 100 people attended, 25 years after her death.

To date, no arrests have been made.

Her grave reads: Princess Doe – Missing From Home; Dead Among Strangers; Remembered By All; Born ? - Found July 15, 1982.

For more information about Princess Doe or the Sunday memorial service, visit: www.princessdoe.org
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
Probe of 1982 'Princess Doe' murder revived by technology
12:35 AM, Jul 13, 2012 | Comments


Written by
| Staff Report


BLAIRSTOWN — Thirty years after a teen girl was beaten to death and left in Cedar Ridge Cemetery, investigators will reveal new information on the case at a Sunday memorial service for the unidentified victim known as “Princess Doe.”

No one has been arrested in the case, but it remains under investigation by the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office Cold Case Unit and other law enforcement agencies. The Cold Case Unit plans to “reveal new information relative to this investigation at the memorial and the advanced forensic techniques they are utilizing to solve this case,” according to a news release from the Prosecutor’s Office.
“We are at a stage with the new technology where I think it will increase our ability to identify this person,” said Warren County Prosecutor Richard Burke. “What we are hoping to do is release some information that will be helpful in how we intend to go forward with this.”
Burke said the information will give a better idea of what the victim looked like.
“We will release on Sunday some of the information we now have and solicit the public’s help in identifying this young lady,” Burke said.
The service, which is open to the public, is set for noon in the cemetery and will include remarks by active and retired law enforcement personnel as well as Pastor David Harvey of Blairstown Presbyterian Church and Warren County Prosecutor Richard Burke.
The body of Princess Doe was discovered by cemetery maintenance workers on July 15, 1982, on the southeast corner of the cemetery, just over a steep bank that leads down to a creek, according to a website devoted to the case.
The girl, who was probably between 14 and 18 years old, died of blunt-force trauma to the head, according to the website, which said that no weapon was found and the type used could not be determined.
The girl was probably 5 feet, 2 inches tall, weighing about 110 pounds, with medium brown, shoulder length hair. Both ears were pierced, the left ear twice and the victim was found, partially clothed in a simple “peasant” skirt and a red short sleeved shirt with yellow piping. She wore a 14-karat gold necklace with a cross on it.
The victim was found with red nail polish on the right hand only and had no known surgical scars, birth marks or tattoos, though scars or marks on the head/face area would not be known because of the condition of the body. No conclusive evidence of sexual assault was found.
Toxicology tests did not reveal any traces of drugs but is not 100 percent conclusive because of the time lapse between the death and discovery of the body, according to the website, which said “It is believed that the body was discovered after 1-3 weeks of exposure.”
The girl eventually was buried on Jan. 22, 1983, not far from where her body was found.
http://www.app.com/article/20120713/NJNEWS...&nclick_check=1
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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monkalup
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The Old Heifer! An oxymoron, of course.
[ *  *  * ]
Investigators inch closer to identifying Princess Doe 30 years after her death
Published: Sunday, July 15, 2012, 4:56 AM
By Kathryn Brenzel | The Express-Times The Express-Times
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Express-Times File Photo | Courtesy ImagePrincess Doe is buried in Blairstown Township, her grave is seen here in a 2007 file photo. Investigators released a new, 3D composite image of what Doe looks like on the 30th anniversary of when her body was discovered.
Murder made her royalty.

But Princess Doe's story is more Grimm than fairy tale, shrouded in 30 years of mystery: A young girl, found bludgeoned to death in a Blairstown Township cemetery, unclaimed and never named.

With decades of unanswered questions, Doe still reigns the psyche of those who seek to unveil her identity.

"I ask the same questions everyone else does," said Eric Kranz, a retired Blairstown detective who originally headed the murder investigation. "How can this be? How does this happen?"

Investigators believe they are closer than ever to unraveling Princess Doe's identity and what led up to her murder. A memorial today at Cedar Ridge Cemetery, where her body was found July 15, 1982, recognizes a 30-year-old enigma.

It represents possible changes: A name for Doe, and a new final resting place. As authorities inch toward what they hope is a breakthrough, efforts are under way to move Doe to Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

Time turns case warm


Though cases usually go cold within 48 hours, the passage of time has proved invaluable in breathing life into the Princess Doe case, said Lt. Stephen Speirs of the Warren County Prosecutor's Office, who has been the lead detective on the case since 1999.

Advances in forensic science have provided investigators with new methods of identification. A high resolution scan of Doe's skull allowed authorities to create a new, computerized composite of her, Speirs said. The composite is more life-like than previous renderings created after her body was exhumed in 1999, he said.

Authorities sent samples of her hair to a lab in Salt Lake City, Utah, to analyze its mineral content. Since mineral levels in food and water vary by region, the analysis may help pinpoint how long she was in Blairstown before her death, as well as where she was prior to arriving in the township, Speirs said.

The results are expected in a few weeks, and Speirs plans to use them to determine what locations he will inundate with the new composite sketch in hopes that someone remembers her.

"She was out there," he said. "Somebody knows her."

Other evidence may reveal who had contact with Doe before her death, including her killer, Speirs said.

Past people of interest -- perhaps most notably Henry Lee Lucas, a Texas man who claimed he killed 100 women -- proved inconclusive. Though lacking evidence, Speirs said he hasn't closed the door on some theories, including that Arthur Kinlaw, a New York man jailed for beating a woman to death, killed Doe.

Kranz, 65, continues to work on the case long after retirement. He is now involved in efforts to have Doe moved to Arlington National Cemetery.

Relocating Doe would provide parents of lost children with something they desperately lack: a special place to grieve and pray, Kranz said. If Doe isn't admitted into Arlington, he and others will work to make the Blairstown cemetery a national memorial.

"She will represent the idea of lost potential as a result of a fiendish, selfish act," he said.
Naming the nameless


Doe was one of the first widely publicized lost children. She was the first unidentified person to be added to the FBI's National Crime Information Center and is one of the first cases to work closely with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

Her case has garnered national attention and inspired a novel, a website and even headgear. Missy Des Londe, an administrator for the Doe Network, a nonprofit organization that assists law enforcement with identifying unidentified missing persons, has a hat bearing a composite sketch of Princess Doe.

She said she wears the hat when she goes to new places, in hopes that the picture may trigger someone's memory.

"I can't stand to think there is a person that just has no name," she said. "I think it's very sad that someone can go so long without being claimed by someone."

After Doe was found on an embankment on the southeast of the graveyard, her head beaten, Kranz thought of his own daughter, who was three years old at the time. He dubbed her "Princess."

"I used to call my daughter that," he said. "I just thought, at the time, somebody may have called her that."

He also wanted to protect Doe from becoming another anonymous face.

"I want to take this person, not knowing who she was, and give her some personality," he said. "To set her apart from all the John and Jane Does."

'Case consumes me'


Princess Doe is one of three unidentified bodies found in Warren County.

Cases remain open for a woman known as the "Tiger Lady," who was found off Route 94 in Knowlton Township in 1991 and named for a tiger tattoo on her left leg. The other is a man found in Knowlton in 1976, near the Delaware Water Gap.

As the lone officer in the prosecutor's office cold case unit, Speirs said he's worked on the Tiger Lady case, but that Princess Doe has occupied most of the time he can dedicate to cold cases.

"Quite honestly," he said, "the Princess Doe case consumes me."

There is no statute of limitations for homicides in New Jersey, so the cold cases will remain active investigations until they are solved.

The time lapse can make investigators' jobs difficult, said New Jersey State Police Detective Sgt. Michael Tansey, who is the assisting head of the state police Missing Persons Unit. Even with the advancement of technology, some people don't leave a trail to identity.

"People don't realize that there is a segment of society that doesn't leave a footprint," he said. "Not reported missing, no government documents, and unless the person has been arrested, no DNA sample or finger prints."

Princess Doe continues to fascinate strangers, which is vital to a resolution, Kranz said. Sustained interest in the Princess Doe case is imperative for other missing and unidentified people, Kranz said.

"If this person doesn't have a value put on her, there's no hope for anybody out there," he said. "For 30 years, I broke my back trying to find out who this girl is. I haven't given up. The Warren County Prosecutor's Office hasn't given up."

***


IF YOU WANT TO GO

Ceremony: Noon today at Cedar Ridge Cemetery, Route 94, Blairstown Township.


Anyone with information can call a toll-free hotline at 866-9426467. For information on the memorial and the case, visit princessdoe.org or call the prosecutor's office at 908-475-6287.

http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/warren-cou...loser_to_i.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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30 years later, Princess Doe's unsolved murder still pushes investigators to find answers
Published: Sunday, July 15, 2012, 8:15 AM
By Richard Khavkine/The Star-Ledger The Star-Ledger
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Jerry McCrea/The Star-LedgerWarren County Prosecutor's Office Lieutenant of Detectives Stephen Speirs is seen at the grave site of Princess Doe in the Cedar Ridge Cemetery in Blairstown.
She wore a simple short-sleeved, candy-apple-red top and an ankle-length wraparound skirt.

Her brown hair was down to her shoulders, and the fingernails on her right hand were polished red.

She looked as young as 14, but she could have been 18.

Her crucifix, ornate and singular, hung from a beaded, 14-karat gold chain draped around her neck.

She was bludgeoned to death beyond recognition and dumped on debris just outside a Blairstown burial ground, 30 years ago today.

She was buried there a few months later, under a majestic maple tree, about 100 feet from where a caretaker at the Cedar Ridge Cemetery stumbled upon her body.

She is still without a proper name.

"She was somebody’s daughter, maybe someone’s sibling. She had friends. She walked this Earth," said Stephen Speirs Jr., a lieutenant with the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office, and since 1999 the lead investigator into the girl’s death.

RELATED COVERAGE:
• In Blairstown, prosecutor to share news on 30-year-old 'Princess Doe' cold case

• Remembering 'Princess Doe'

• 80 attend memorial service for 'Princess Doe'

Speirs, 50, stood a few feet from her grave site last week. He was expressing both hope that she would be identified and frustration that, three decades after her killing, she was still unknown. And that her killer could still be walking this Earth.

"You find out who she is, you find out who did this," said now-retired Blairstown Lt. Eric Kranz, who led the initial investigation into the killing.

Despite dozens of leads, many tantalizing, that ultimately proved false or inconclusive, both men are more confident now than ever that the girl — who Kranz named "Princess Doe" in the hopes she would not become another forever-anonymous Jane — will be identified.

"I would be shocked if we don’t get closure," said Kranz, 65, who left the police department in 1985.

Last week, he was putting up notices announcing today’s noontime memorial service for Princess Doe. Kranz said he still thinks of her "every day, every waking hour."

Very little is known about the girl. A post-mortem determined she was Caucasian and non-Hispanic. She had double piercings through her left ear and bore no surgical scars, birthmarks or tattoos. She was well-nourished, and she didn’t appear to have been homeless.

But she could have been nearly anyone, and come from nearly anywhere.

"We can’t narrow in," Speirs said, as traffic rumbled past on nearby Route 94 and crows cawed from perches in the cemetery’s trees. "It’s been hard to tell."


View full sizeAn artist's rendering of Princess Doe from 2007, left, along with an updated computer sketch.

View full sizePhotos provided by the Warren County Prosecutor's Office show the outfit Princess Doe was wearing, along with her necklace (inset).
The chances of catching a killer typically start to diminish after about 48 hours. But enabled by breakthroughs in forensic science, evidence collected three decades ago might just be starting to yield clues.

"In a case like this," Speirs said, "time is on my side. There’s so many more things I can do."

On Friday, Speirs received a half-dozen sketches based on a CT scan of the girl’s skull.

"This is what she would have looked like before she was murdered," he said.

Recently, Speirs had the girl’s sweater top and patterned skirt put on a mannequin that duplicated Princess Doe’s 5-foot, 2-inch, 105-pound frame.

"It almost came to life," he said. "It spoke to me; I think it will speak to the public."

Last week, a forensics lab in Utah received 40 strands of the girl’s hair. Those locks contain the chemical composition of the water the girl was drinking for as long as her hair was growing.

Because chemicals in water vary slightly and in predictable patterns according to a particular combination of geography and climate, "we know where to expect to find that isotope in a landscape," said Lesley Chesson, an analytical chemist with IsoForensics Services in Salt Lake City.

By the end of the month or in early August, Chesson will have helped Speirs map out Princess Doe’s whereabouts week by week for about a year before her death.

"We can take our resources and saturate that region," he said.

And yet more testing of crime-scene DNA — almost a cliché in criminal inquiries now but not even on the investigative radar 30 years ago — will soon be under way, he said.

Where an accurate profile being done in the mid-1980s might have required drops of blood, said Dixie Peters, the technical leader at the missing-persons unit at the University of North Texas’ Health Science Center in Fort Worth, "now we need something very, very small."

In the coming weeks, Speirs will address just such a package to Peters’ unit: "We may have some trace (DNA) that was not contributed by the victim," he said.

Through the decades, forensics analyses have eliminated dozens of leads and possible matches.


Richard Raska/The Star-LedgerA 1983 Star-Ledger photo shows the fresh grave of Princess Doe.
"It’s disappointing, but you’re whittling it down," said Speirs, who will retire from the prosecutor’s office at the end of the month but will stay close to the investigation.

But for all of what science can determine, he said, the best ally he might have is someone’s conscience.

"Somebody may decide, 'It’s time for me to talk,'" he said.

Or maybe the memory of someone who might have known the girl will be jarred by renewed attention to the case.

The investigation into Princess Doe’s death has reached far beyond this quaint, rural corner of the state, where green rolling hills lead to the Delaware Water Gap.

Kranz said that because of his inquiries to police jurisdictions throughout the country, 27 disappearances and three murders were solved as investigations were reinvigorated in dozens of missing-persons cases.

But a solution to the case that matters most to the two detectives has remained frustratingly elusive.

After the initial investigation into Princess Doe’s death concluded, township residents paid for her burial and a simple headstone.

"Missing from home," the engraving reads. "Dead among strangers / Remembered by all / Born ? — Found July 15, 1982."

Speirs and Kranz just want to add a name.


Anyone with information in the case is asked to call the prosecutor’s office’s Princess Doe tip line at (866) 942-6467.


http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/07/3...wn_girls_u.html
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.nj.com/warrenreporter/index.ssf...rs_offi_40.html
Warren County Prosecutor's Office determined to solve 30-year-old 'Princess Doe' case
Published: Monday, July 16, 2012, 10:22 AM Updated: Monday, July 16, 2012, 11:17 AM
By Todd Petty / Staff Writer The Warren Reporter
Todd Petty / Staff Writer Princess Doe Memorial Service Sunday, July 15, 2012 gallery (46 photos)

BLAIRSTOWN — Thirty years have passed and the question still remains: who was Princess Doe?

Many have searched tirelessly for an answer, but the unidentified girl, whose body was found brutally beaten to death in the southeast corner of the Cedar Ridge Cemetery here, has lived in the psyche of county residents — without a face or name.

But that could change over the course of the next couple of months with the help of advances in science and technology, according to the staff at the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office.

About 100 people attended the memorial service at noon Sunday. Friends and family gathered. Many held cameras. Some even laid flowers on the grave of the girl whose life was lost decades ago. Nearby, a mannequin the approximate shape and size of Princess Doe stood for all to see, similarly faceless, but wearing the actual clothes found on Princess Doe’s body when she was discovered on July 15, 1982, in the cemetery by maintenance workers.

It is believed the body had been there 1-to-3 weeks when she was found, according to information provided by the Doe Network, a volunteer organization that assists law enforcement with missing- and unidentified-person cold cases.

RELATED COVERAGE:

• 30 years later, Princess Doe's unsolved murder still pushes investigators to find answers

• In Blairstown, prosecutor to share news on 30-year-old 'Princess Doe' cold case
Retired Blairstown police Lt. Eric Kranz, the first investigator to work on the case, and the one who named the girl “Princess Doe,” was the first to speak at the service.

He applauded the Prosecutor’s Office for keeping the case open after so many years.

“In supporting this investigation, the honorable Richard Burke has placed a value on this girl which says: ‘not here, not in this jurisdiction, not now, not ever.’”

For Kranz, the case hits close to home. He spoke of his daughter Michelle who lost her life to cancer in 2007. He remembered the time they spent together, often discussing the Princess Doe case — time that Kranz valued. “There is a whole bunch of families out there, thousands upon thousands, who will never have what I had — who will never be able to say goodbye.”

That’s why Kranz is working to create a monument that would emphasize the value of the lives of missing and unidentified victims. “This memorial must stand as man’s acknowledgment to God’s creation,” he said.

Kranz hopes to have an interment at the national cemetery in Arlington, Va., in addition to the creation of a national monument at the cemetery here in Blairstown.

Christie Leigh Napurano, the author of “The Untold Story of Princess Doe” shared a few words at the service.

“Princess Doe was someone’s daughter, someone’s sister, someone’s granddaughter, someone’s niece, someone’s neighbor, someone’s friend. She was a person, who like every other person on this earth, deserves to rest in peace with a name and an identity.”

Richard T. Burke, who began as Warren County prosecutor near the end of March, said there’s an old axiom in investigative work: “Basically the feeling is the more time goes on, the less of an opportunity you have to identify somebody. We actually feel the opposite in this case.”

Burke said the passage of time has assisted the office with advances in technology and forensic science. The Prosecutor’s Office will be able to revisit old evidence with new technology.

Warren County Lt. Detective Stephen Speirs, who has handled the case since 1999, explained two new advances in particular that are helping with the case.

The first is a free-form CT scan that helped the office create what they believe is the most accurate rendering of Princess Doe yet. Her skull was used to create a bust that Speirs unveiled at the service.

The second advance is the Prosecutor’s Office can now resubmit evidence tested years ago. In particular, Speirs said there is trace evidence that could yield clues as to who had been in contact with her. The results are expected in about two months.

“We really feel at this point in time that we need to focus on the identity of this young woman. That’s our goal. By doing so, not only will we bring closure to Princess Doe and her family, but hopefully be able to identify the person who committed this horrendous act.”

Speirs emphasized the unique clothing worn by the girl: a red short-sleeve shirt and a red-and-white peasant skirt. Princess Doe was an estimated 5-foot-2 and 110 pounds. She is believed to be between the age of 14 and 18. Her hair was medium brown and shoulder length. Both of her ears were pierced, the left ear twice. She had no known scars or tattoos. She was found with red nail polish on the right hand only and a 14k gold necklace with a small cross.

“She walked this earth,” Speirs said. “She had parents. She had family members, She may have had siblings.She had a doctor, she had a dentist and she had friends. Somebody out there has to know her, and we’re hoping with all of this that we’re doing that somebody will come forward and recognize her.”

Until then, the question remains: Who was Princess Doe?

Travis Riggs, who was only 4 years old and living in Blairstown at the time of the murder, has created a website, princessdoe.org, dedicated to providing information about the girl. He also organized the memorial service.

A toll free “Tips & Leads” hotline has been established by the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office at 1-866-942-6467 for the public to call with information. Callers can remain anonymous.

To report information regarding this investigation please call the “Tips & Leads” toll-free number above or Lt. Stephen Speirs at 908-343-4645.

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Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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http://www.wfmz.com/news/The-search-to-ide...um/-/index.html
The search to identify Princess Doe in NJAuthor: John Craven, Reporter, John.Craven@wfmz.com
Published On: Jul 14 2012 08:00:00 PM EDT Updated On: Jul 16 2012 05:25:22 AM EDT
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The search to identify Princess Doe in NJ
BLAIRSTOWN, N.J. -
Authorities in Warren Co., N.J., are hoping new information will bring new leads so they can finally crack a decades-old murder case.

Sunday marked 30 years since a worker discovered a teenage girl beaten to death at Cedar Ridge Cemetery in Blairstown.

When now retired Blairstown Det. Eric Kranz got the call about a body found at the cemetery in July 1982, he was incredulous.

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She's now called "Princess Doe." The clothes and necklace she was wearing were the only visible clues she left behind.

"She was beaten beyond recognition," said Kranz. "Her head was demolished."

For the past three decades, Warren Co. investigators have been trying to identify her.

"Just knowing that she's never had a real name or anything, just kind of a sad," said Val Colbeth, a Palmer Twp., Pa., florist who helped with the victim's funeral.

The case drew national headlines, an "America's Most Wanted" segment, and a slew of possible matches to missing girls. In 2005, a prison inmate even admitted to the killing, claiming "Princess Doe" was a teenaged prostitute from Long Island.

"The problem we've had all along in this case -- we do not have any physical evidence to connect that person or persons, or we do not have the identity of the victim," said Lt. Det. Stephen Speirs, who took over the case in the late 1990s.

Sunday, investigators unveiled a new bust showing exactly what the victim probably looked like. It uses advanced imaging from a CT scan of Princess Doe's skull.

"When I looked at it, it blows me away," said Kranz. "I can't get over it, that I'm actually looking at this person."

Investigators have also ordered new DNA testing on the victim's hair. Elements in Princess Doe's hair could show in what geographic regions she ate or even drank tap water, up to a year before she died.

"It can also possibly trace her travels," said Speirs. "If she went from let's say the Southeast and came up the coast over a period of a year, we might be able to track that travel."

In what could be a major break, detectives have also found DNA on the remains belonging to someone else. All this new DNA testing should be finished within the next two months, according to prosecutors.

Authorities also announced a new tip line for the case: (866) 942-6467.

You can learn more on the Princess Doe website.

Princess Doe's American Most Wanted profile is also listed online.

Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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Identifying Princess Doe: 30 Years After She Was Slain, New Technology May ID Her and The KillerBy Jaclyn Gallucci on August 2nd, 2012




The print bordering the skirt Princess Doe was wearing at the time of her death. (Photo: Warren County Prosecutor's Office)
In the back of a small roadside cemetery under the arms of a giant maple tree in rural New Jersey she stands, her back toward the steep ravine, the sound of running water below and birds calling back and forth above. Her skirt rustles in the breeze on this warm and sunny summer day. Her T-shirt is stained and torn. Strangers stare at her, taking pictures. She doesn’t say a word.

This headless mannequin dressed in red standing erect among the headstones is an eerie sight from the busy state road that borders the Cedar Ridge Cemetery in this small township of nearly 6,000.


advertisement Here, in Blairstown, everyone seems to know each other—police, business owners, neighbors—everyone except for the teenage girl found barefoot, partially clothed and beaten beyond recognition the morning of July 15, 1982.

“She was erased,” says retired Blairstown Police Lt. Eric Kranz, who first responded to the scene. “Her assailant erased her. There was nothing left to her. Whoever did this did it with a vengeance.”

Found with her skull literally smashed into pieces, her face was so violently battered that the medical examiner couldn’t determine her eye color. Today, she is brought back to life, as detectives dress a plastic replica of her body in the original clothes she was wearing the morning a cemetery worker spotted the crucifix tangled in her hair among the dirt and rocks covering the bank, just yards away from where this still-shocked and baffled town buried her 30 years ago. Now more than 100 locals are gathered here for Princess Doe’s grim anniversary.

“We pray for those who are intent on committing acts of violence—may your spirit nudge them and awaken them to realize the value of life,” says Pastor David Harvey from the Blairstown Presbyterian Church, looking down at the pile of flowers left on her headstone. “We pray for the day when her identity may be known, which as of today is known only to you…”



A color-enhanced version of the most recent and most accurate 3D composite of Princess Doe created by the Smithsonian Institute using a CT scan of her skull. (Photo: Warren County Prosecutor's Office)
It’s a mystery that’s intrigued law enforcement, the media and locals alike. Her story has been the subject of books, TV specials, spurred unidentified and missing persons movements and inspired landmark legislation across the nation—she was the first unidentified crime victim to be entered into the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database. Still, the victim detectives call “Princess Doe” remains a girl without a name.

Technology has advanced rapidly throughout the decades, however, and with the anniversary of her discovery comes the renewed hope that somewhere out there is someone who knows her identity. This July detectives released an updated 3-D composite of Princess Doe and resubmitted DNA evidence for testing. Later this month her story will be featured on America’s Most Wanted.

“There’s an old axiom in investigative work where basically the feeling is that the more the time goes on the less of an opportunity you have to identify somebody,” says Warren County Prosecutor Richard Burke. “We actually feel the opposite in this case.”

And while this cemetery 117 miles from the Nassau County line may seem worlds apart, detectives believe the clues to the identity of their most famous Jane Doe very likely can be found here on Long Island.



The clothing Princess Doe was found wearing on a mannequin that is her approximate height and weight. (Photo: Warren County Prosecutor's Office)
DEAD AMONG STRANGERS
Her name is made up of more numbers than letters: Depending on what database you look in, Princess Doe is officially known as U-630870962, 1513, 36UFNJ or NJF820715.

She is one of 8,528 documented nameless dead entered by medical examiners and coroners across the country into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) database, a similar, but not all-inclusive, version of NCIC available to the public.

Those outside of New Jersey might never have heard of Princess Doe at all if it weren’t for the detective who refused to let her be another number in a pool of thousands. Instead of calling her Jane Doe, he nicknamed her Princess Doe. After all, at some point in time, she must have been someone’s little girl.

“I knew this was going to be tough,” says Kranz. “So what I did was I tried to separate her from all the other Jane and John Does and give her a personality of sorts. I got a mannequin and dressed it in her clothes.”

It worked. Most unidentified murder victims don’t make the news after they’re initially found, unless they are later identified, but Princess Doe’s case received nationwide coverage. Still, very little is known about her.

She was white, about 5-feet, 2-inches tall and around 100 pounds at the time of her death, according to the Warren County Medical Examiner’s Office. She was between 14 and 18 years old, had blood type O and four fillings in her back molars.

She still had her appendix and tonsils, and had never given birth. She was found wearing no shoes or underwear. Her ears were pierced, the left one twice, and she had red nail polish only on her right hand. She wore a gold cross, red T-shirt and a broomstick skirt with peacocks printed on the bottom. She had light brown, shoulder-length hair.

No evidence could conclusively determine whether or not Princess Doe was sexually assaulted or had drugs in her system because of the condition of her body, which could have been lying in the cemetery anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, according to the medical examiner’s report.

Longtime Blairstown resident Ann Latimer still remembers the shock of hearing the news. The registered nurse was working the weekend shift at a nearby hospital at the time.

“One of the doctors was reading the newspaper and he said, ‘Oh, isn’t this appropriate: a body was found in the Blairstown cemetery,’” she says. “I didn’t think anything of it. I had gone out to dinner that night after work. I came home and pulled the paper out of the mailbox and right on the front page was the girl’s clothes. I knew it was her.”



Princess Doe's gravesite on July 15, 2012
On July 13, two days prior to the discovery, at around 11:30 a.m., Latimer was shopping in the local A&P supermarket, which occupied a building, now a tractor supply company, directly across from the Cedar Ridge Cemetery.

“I saw her,” she says, her eyes fixed on the clothed mannequin standing at the foot of Princess Doe’s grave while she recalled the sighting from so long ago. “My daughter was with me. She was 6 years old then, and she said, ‘Oh, mommy, mommy, is that an eagle on her skirt?’ So I said, ‘No, that’s a peacock.’”

Latimer went to the police and they had her hypnotized, hoping to get her to recall more details, such as whether the girl had been with anyone—but Latimer couldn’t.

“I wanted to ask her where she got the skirt because it was so unique, it was pretty,” says Latimer. “But she sort of looked away, and there was a little kid walking past me with one of those little fake plastic shopping carts so that took my attention away, but that was my glimpse of her.”



The most recent, and what is believed to be the most accurate, 3D composite of Princess Doe created by the Smithsonian Institute using a CT scan of her skull. (Photo: Warren County Prosecutor's Office)
Kranz says after he heard about Latimer’s possible sighting, he went straight to the A&P.

“I checked if there were any cards used, I went through that thing upside-down and checked it,” he says. “I was in every catch basin, in every garbage pail and dumpster—didn’t miss one.”

But it was another dead end. Her fingerprints were checked against millions of others and Kranz reviewed countless missing persons cases, but to no avail.

In order to keep her body from winding up in an anonymous grave in a Potter’s field, residents and local businesses pitched in to provide a gravesite, hearse, casket, flowers and a headstone that reads: “Princess Doe, Missing From Home, Dead Among Strangers, Remembered By All, Born ? – Found July 15, 1982.” Her casket was escorted by patrol cars, and she was buried Jan. 22, 1983 yards away from where she’d been found six months before. More than a decade went by with little movement on the case. Lt. Kranz retired, but stayed with it.

“There hasn’t been a day—not a day—that has gone by where I don’t work on this case. This case created a lot of disconcertion in my life, a lot of issues,” says Kranz. “I went against all the norms—the norms of ‘You know this is one of a million, you always find ’em. Forget about it, let it go. There’s gonna be another one tomorrow’—you know all that thinking, and I just felt that if you applied yourself, that if you just put yourself into this, you’d find her, and the more I did it and the more roadblocks I ran into, the more I dug in.”

Soon all that digging would pay off. Kranz’ successor, Det. Lt. Stephen Speirs of the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office, who took over the case in 1998, was about to get a new lead, one that would take him right to LI’s shores.



The most recent, and what is believed to be the most accurate, 3D composite of Princess Doe created by the Smithsonian Institute using a CT scan of her skull. (Photo: Warren County Prosecutor's Office)
BUILDING A MYSTERY
The air is just as salty on the other side of the Throgs Neck Bridge in the Bronx as on any of LI’s beaches, but the waterfront property lining Zerega Avenue is a stark contrast to that of its southeastern neighbor. Industrial trucks, buildings, dumpsters and gates block out the rocky slope down to the East River below. From the sidewalks the salty air is the only indication the Long Island Sound is just steps away, but this stretch has a storied and tormented past.

Back in the early ’80s, longtime pimp Arthur Kinlaw—who moved between Central Islip, Greenlawn and Bellport—ran a prostitution ring here in Hunts Point, sending women he would pick up in Suffolk County to sell themselves, said his wife, Donna Kinlaw, in an Oct. 10, 1999 Newsday article. The graduate of Brentwood High School and former employee of the Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center was one of them, she told the newspaper.

In addition to the Hunts Point prostitution business, the couple allegedly traveled the country as far as Alaska, committing all sorts of crimes, from burglary to welfare fraud, each of them accumulating dozens of arrests. In June 1998, Arthur and Donna were arrested in California after Donna allegedly used “Elaina,” the name of one of Arthur’s former Long Island prostitutes, to forge welfare papers, the article recounts. When detectives tracked down the real Elaina, she gave detectives their biggest lead to date in the Princess Doe investigation.

According to the Newsday piece and published reports in other New York metropolitan newspapers, Elaina allegedly told detectives how Arthur, with Donna’s help, drugged, strangled and beat a woman Elaina knew only as “Linda”—a teenager he’d met in a Bay Shore reggae bar called Blackberry Jam, now a church, in April 1984. She reportedly said he’d struck Linda in the head with an aluminum baseball bat on a dark dirt road in Hunts Point when she refused to work as a prostitute for him. He then drove her body to an area near the NYC Department of Sanitation yard on Zerega Avenue, wrapped her in an old shower curtain and dumped her in the East River.

The decomposed body of Linda—who was white, 5-feet, 4-inches tall and about 130 pounds with shoulder-length dark brown hair—washed up weeks later and remains unidentified to this day. Arthur described details of the 1984 slaying in his appearance in Bronx Supreme Court in 2000, according to Newsday, but neither he nor his wife would be connected to the murders of three other women, including Princess Doe, until Donna, in a bid to save herself from life in prison over her part in Linda’s murder, squealed to police.

She reportedly told detectives that in 1983 Arthur beat to death a 300-pound disabled boarder they had taken into their Bellport home to help pay the bills—a black or Hispanic woman in her 20s or 30s who relied on crutches to walk. Donna reportedly told police Arthur dragged the woman out to the backyard of their Michigan Avenue home, where he buried her in a makeshift grave before pouring a cement patio over her. Police found the woman’s remains on Dec. 21, 2000, and she, too, remains unidentified.

Donna also told detectives about Christine Kozma, a drug-addicted Bay Shore woman who turned to prostitution to support her habit, according to the article. Kozma was last seen leaving her East Main Street apartment in September 1982. Her body was later found in a wooded area of Coram with multiple gun shots to her head. Donna reportedly told detectives Arthur had brought Kozma back to their Central Islip home, had sex with her, then killed her when she wouldn’t work the streets for him. It wasn’t the first time he’d done that, she alleged to police.



A recent backyard photo of Arthur and Donna Kinlaw's former Bellport Home, where the body of a still-unidentified disabled woman--allegedly beaten to death by Arthur Kinlaw during an argument in 1984 and buried under a freshly poured concrete patio soon after--was excavated by police on Dec. 21, 2000.
Donna claimed that in July of that year, Arthur brought home a girl who was about 18 years old, left with her, then came back alone, cleaned out his car and dumped his clothing, according to the Newsday story. Weeks later, during an argument between them, Donna said Arthur admitted to Princess Doe’s murder, reports the article.

“‘He told me if I didn’t go to work, he would do to me what he did to the other girl,’” Newsday quotes Donna as saying. “‘In the middle of the arguing, I said, ‘Well, what did you do to the other girl?’ He said, ‘I’ll take your life just like I took hers.’”

Arthur gave Lt. Speirs some shocking news of his own, the New Jersey detective tells the Press.

“Let’s put it this way, I can’t use the word confession,” says Speirs. “He made some admissions. I’ll put it in these terms: He claimed responsibility for her death. But I have no physical evidence to confirm that, and without the identity of Princess Doe, I have no way of connecting the dots so to speak, putting her in a place where he could have been or would have been at the same time. That’s the unfortunate thing right now. The key thing is to identify her. If we could identify her, then I can try to verify the information [Arthur Kinlaw] provided.”

Arthur also told Speirs something Donna had neglected to mention—that she was in the Blairstown cemetery and witnessed Arthur allegedly beating Princess Doe to death, he tells the Press. When Speirs later confronted her with Arthur’s accusations, the detective says Donna admitted she saw the young girl murdered and helped a forensic artist create a composite sketch of Princess Doe. But was it all true?

“I have no way of disputing it, but I also have no way of confirming it,” says Speirs.

Donna also couldn’t provide a first name for the girl.

“That’s part of the problem,” he continues. “Neither [Arthur] nor [Donna] were able to provide a name, which I felt was quite odd depending on the amount of time they spent with her, if this story is true.”

Arthur was convicted of two counts of second-degree murder. He is currently serving 20 years to life and is eligible for parole in 2018, according to New York State Department of Corrections records. Donna eventually became a witness for the state and pleaded out to 3 to 10 years for manslaughter in Linda’s homicide instead of serving a possible life sentence on murder charges, according to Newsday. She was released in 2003, state records show, but did not respond to a request for comment for this story as of press time.



Left: A composite sketch created by a forensic artist with the help of Donna Kinlaw. Right: A computer-generated image of Princess Doe's face provided by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. (Photos: Warren County Prosecutor's Office)
Even if the Kinlaw lead comes up blank, Kranz says he still feels strongly that Princess Doe is from LI.

“[The Kinlaws] are one reason. That’s not the whole reason,” he says. “You can call that ‘detective’s hunch’ or whatever the case may be, but we just seem to be always going out towards that area.”

For now, the murder of Princess Doe remains a mystery but Speirs follows every tip.

“There are other theories, but again, I can’t base my facts on theories, I have to base my theories on facts,” says Speirs. “And I have really no strong facts that appear to say the Kinlaws are involved or not involved. It’s an open door and there have been other persons of interest prior to that, and there have been persons of interest since then. Again, I go back to that unfortunately we have no way of substantiating any of this information because no one is providing a name or identity—we don’t know who she is. At this point, there is no physical evidence to tie any of these people in to this crime.”

All of this could soon change, however.



Retired Blairstown Police Lieutenant Eric Kranz
DOWN TO A SCIENCE
In 1999, Speirs had Princess Doe’s body exhumed to retrieve DNA from her remains to help in the identification process. Back then, DNA analysis was in its infancy, but the technology has come a long way over the past decade and samples taken in the past could provide new clues today.

“Preliminary results from those tests suggest that we may have some trace evidence that does not belong or was not contributed by Princess Doe,” says Speirs. “Now, we can resubmit [the DNA] because we can do so many better things now. It’s more advanced so we can take the smallest amounts of trace evidence and be able to develop a DNA profile.”

That means detectives might be in possession of DNA belonging to Princess Doe’s killer, or at the very least, someone who was with her before she died who could possibly identify her.

“If this evidence does prove to be contributed not from Princess Doe, but from someone other than Princess Doe, then that clearly gives us a person of interest,” says Speirs. “I’ve never been more optimistic than I am now, and I’ve been around the block on everything you can imagine, all over the place, with this case.”



Det. Lieutenant Stephen Speirs of the Warren County Prosecutor's Office
Speirs resubmitted the DNA in July, and the results are due back from the lab in September, along with other test results. Princess Doe’s hair is also undergoing analysis in an attempt to see what part of the country she was in prior to her death.

“The scientists, hopefully through metal deposits in her hair, will be able to focus us a little bit more in the areas where she may have been or lived,” says Prosecutor Burke. “The passage of time has really helped us with regards to technology and forensic science.”

And there’s a lot riding on that science.

“If [the tests] show she was from the East Coast and the metropolitan area, that’s beautiful. That’s one more thing closer to matching the story with the Kinlaws,” says Speirs. “If it says she’s from the Midwest, then that kind of throws things out a little bit. But it doesn’t completely eliminate it because she could have been from the Midwest, and came here and stayed here for a period of time. Who knows?”

And finally there’s the new composite released just weeks ago, created by the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. using a CT scan of Princess Doe’s skull, which may be the best hope yet.

“All of the other renditions prior to this were renditions by artists, and each one of them have their own personality in that,” says Kranz. “Through their experience they say this eye is lower as a rule or this nose is moved, this nostril is wider—they each had their own conception of what she could have looked like. What Smithsonian did in this case was take all that emotion out of it and use pure science. So this is 100 percent unadulterated science, and what makes me feel that this is the closest rendition to what she looks like that’s ever been done.”

There is also still the possibility that someone will recognize Princess Doe’s clothes. Although the label was missing on the shirt and the label on the skirt was faded, Speirs says he found a company in the Midwest that manufactured the exact type of skirt she was wearing back in the ’80s.

“They sent them all over the place including the metropolitan area, so that could fit,” he says. “It could have been purchased somewhere in the Long Island area or Manhattan.”

Though officially retiring this week, Speirs, just like Kranz, tells the Press he will never abandon Princess Doe’s case.

“I still live locally,” he says. “I’m really not going anywhere; I will still be part of the case.”

So will Prosecutor Burke.



Left: A sketch created by a forensic artist using details provided by Donna Kinlaw. Right: The most recent, and most accurate according to detectives, digital composite created from a CT scan of Princess Doe's skull
“We really feel that at this point in time we need to focus on the identity of this young woman, that’s our goal,” says Burke. “We also believe that by doing so not only will we bring closure to Princess Doe and her family but hopefully be able to identify the person who committed this horrendous act.”

For Kranz, the quest to identify Princess Doe has become personal.

“I had experienced the loss of my daughter Michelle in 2007 from cancer,” he says. “Through the course of her illness, Michelle and I spoke many times of the Princess Doe case and what it meant to us.

“Through the process of [Michelle’s] passing, I thought about how we were able to talk about things,” he continues. “I held her hand, I kissed her and hugged her and held her body. We shared a gift, a God-given gift, one I will never forget. There are a whole bunch of families out there, thousands upon thousands, that will never have what I had, never be able to say goodbye…

“One of the reasons why I’ve stuck with this as long as I have…I think it’s a matter of value, I really do. And I think we have become very coarse. I mean it sounds odd from a cop.

“I’ve seen death,” he adds. “I’ve seen more death than I care to ever see again. But I just think that if you lose that disgust over somebody that young being murdered, if you lose the despair over it, I think we’re a doomed society.”

If you have any information that could be related to Princess Doe, please call the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office Princess Doe Tip Line at 1-866-942-6467.

http://www.longislandpress.com/2012/08/02/...g-princess-doe/
Lauran

"If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don't do that, you are wasting your time on this earth." The late, great Roberto Clemente.


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