Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to The New Coffee Room. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Anonymous
Topic Started: Feb 6 2018, 05:17 AM (220 Views)
Jolly
Member Avatar
The Truth is out there.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2018/02/05/all-she-has-to-do-to-collect-a-560-million-lotto-jackpot-is-make-her-name-public-she-refuses/?utm_term=.3f260c5de19d
The main obstacle to a stable and just world order is the United States.- George Soros
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Improviso
Member Avatar
HOLY CARP!!!
Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy everything else.
Identifying narcissists isn't difficult. Just look for the person who is constantly fishing for compliments
and admiration while breaking down over even the slightest bit of criticism.

We have the freedom to choose our actions, but we do not get to choose our consequences.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
George K
Member Avatar
Finally
Improviso
Feb 6 2018, 05:23 AM
Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy everything else.
Including a security staff.
A guide to GKSR: Click

"Now look here, you Baltic gas passer... "
- Mik, 6/14/08


Nothing is as effective as homeopathy.

Given the way acetaminophen and alcohol don’t mix, I haven’t kept a bottle of Tylenol anywhere in the house for years.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
jon-nyc
Member Avatar
Cheers
My friend went through this when he won 44MM in Virginia. Even explored selling the ticket.

Finally when he realized he couldn’t avoid it he hired a PR firm to help minimize the exposure they got.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Friday
Senior Carp
She has a year.

And the money to hire a bunch of lawyers to come up with something to her liking.

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Klaus
Member Avatar
HOLY CARP!!!
I like her already.
Attempto!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
brenda
Member Avatar
..............
I agree with Friday. This gal has the smarts and time to come up with a plan, and the funds to pay for a good one.
“Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them.”
~A.A. Milne
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Luke's Dad
Member Avatar
Emperor Pengin
I've told Karla in the past that if we ever won (kind of hard to do, since we don't buy tickets) that the first thing I would do if our numbers came up is get out of town. I wouldn't turn in the ticket, I wouldn't tell anybody, just book an overseas flight and take the family to Europe for a couple of weeks. While in Europe, I'd contact a few attorneys I know and get recommendations for discrete private detectives. Then I would hire one of those detectives and the attorneys to investigate me. Get a full list of any obligations that I may want to resolve before redeeming the ticket. I also want to find out how visible my life is and make arrangements to make myself and my family as invisible as possible. Social Media would be scrubbed as clean as possible, house would be put up for sale, and I'd make arrangements to get a condo in a nice building with discreet management and security. This would be temporary, just until we get settled in and find a house where we can have a little assurance of privacy. All of this before I turn the ticket in.
The problem with having an open mind is that people keep trying to put things in it.
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Copper
Member Avatar
Shortstop

I'd give it away, it's nothing but trouble.

I have an annual subscription.

I might keep a few dollars, very few just in case.

The Confederate soldier was peculiar in that he was ever ready to fight, but never ready to submit to the routine duty and discipline of the camp or the march. The soldiers were determined to be soldiers after their own notions, and do their duty, for the love of it, as they thought best. Carlton McCarthy
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jolly
Member Avatar
The Truth is out there.
May have told this story before, but bear with us senile folks...

I worked with a gal who got a strange phone call one night. It was her brother calling from a cheap motel in Arkansas, where he had checked in under an assumed name.

He lived in St. Louis and had won the Powerball or Megamillions or whatever they have up there. Anyway, IIRC his part was $17M after taxes. After he came forward to double check his numbers and claim his prize, he didn't even make it home before his cellphone started ringing with people he barely knew. He hadn't been home ten minutes, when his door bell started ringing. He turned off his phone, jumped in his car and drove to Arkansas, where he found a place that would take cash and then he called his sister.

He just wanted a place to hang out for a few weeks, let the publicity die down a bit and try to get his ducks in a row. He wound up selling his house in St. Louis, selling his business and moving to parts unknown (at least for the majority of people).
The main obstacle to a stable and just world order is the United States.- George Soros
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Luke's Dad
Member Avatar
Emperor Pengin
Jolly
Feb 6 2018, 02:54 PM
May have told this story before, but bear with us senile folks...

I worked with a gal who got a strange phone call one night. It was her brother calling from a cheap motel in Arkansas, where he had checked in under an assumed name.

He lived in St. Louis and had won the Powerball or Megamillions or whatever they have up there. Anyway, IIRC his part was $17M after taxes. After he came forward to double check his numbers and claim his prize, he didn't even make it home before his cellphone started ringing with people he barely knew. He hadn't been home ten minutes, when his door bell started ringing. He turned off his phone, jumped in his car and drove to Arkansas, where he found a place that would take cash and then he called his sister.

He just wanted a place to hang out for a few weeks, let the publicity die down a bit and try to get his ducks in a row. He wound up selling his house in St. Louis, selling his business and moving to parts unknown (at least for the majority of people).
That's why I would want to take care of things before hand. Karla was asking why we would sell our house and move into a condo, I told her because it wouldn't be an hour before prople are slipping and falling on our sidewalks out front.
The problem with having an open mind is that people keep trying to put things in it.
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Friday
Senior Carp
So the lesson is "Don't sign your name!"

I don't blame her for wanting anonymity. I wouldn't tell my kids or my mother or anyone. Just my husband. And whichever pro we hire to help us deal with the winnings.

But (like LD) I won't have this problem because I never play.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
jon-nyc
Member Avatar
Cheers
She’s not likely to be successful. And I’ll bet she ends up claiming it all the same.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Copper
Member Avatar
Shortstop

Lots of good neighbors

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/02/12/lawyers-for-anonymous-powerball-winner-bombarded-with-offers-help-from-strangers/CqJWx4qtMQfr8WwTJPSRhP/story.html

Quote:
 
Lawyers for anonymous Powerball winner are bombarded with offers of help from strangers

Lawyers for a New Hampshire woman suing for the right to collect a $560 million Powerball jackpot anonymously have been inundated with harebrained messages from strangers offering to help their client in exchange for a cut of her winnings, court records show.

Attorneys for the woman, identified in legal documents as Jane Doe, on Monday provided details of the bizarre offers in a filing in Hillsborough County Superior Court in Nashua. A hearing on the lawsuit, filed against the New Hampshire Lottery Commission, is scheduled for Tuesday.

“Press reports begat solicitations and proposed ‘solutions’ from all over the world,” wrote Steven M. Gordon, an attorney for Doe, in Monday’s filing. “ ... The offers had a general theme: for a fee — ranging from ‘as little’ as $10 million to 1 [percent] of the prize — the individual would take on Ms. Doe’s identity and collect the funds and then remit to her the remaining proceeds.”

Gordon included biographical information on several people who contacted his firm, the high-powered Shaheen & Gordon group that counts William Shaheen, a former US attorney in New Hampshire and husband of Senator Jeanne Shaheen, among its partners.

Among Doe’s many would-be helpers are a Navy veteran “who had fallen on hard times”; a company in Indonesia seeking investors; a “caged bird” in North Carolina who’s hoping “to soar”; a single father in Colorado who said he’ll be Doe’s “scapegoat”; and another North Carolina resident describing herself as a single parent of five, willing to turn in Doe’s ticket in exchange for a six-bedroom house, used car, and a small trust for each of her children, Gordon wrote.

Doe’s complaint says she visited the commission’s website last month when she realized she had won and followed the agency’s instructions for redeeming her prize, signing the back of her Powerball ticket and printing her address and phone number.

But after speaking with a lawyer, the complaint says, Doe realized she could have maintained her privacy if a trustee had signed the ticket instead.

She has created a trust and wants the state to either withhold her name from public disclosure or replace her identifying information with that of the trust. However, the complaint says, the commission has informed her that any alteration of the ticket will make it invalid.

“As a lottery jackpot winner, Ms. Doe is now part of a small demographic which has historically been victimized by the unscrupulous, often with life-changing or life-threatening consequences,” Gordon wrote. “Previous winners have been the victims of violence, threats, harassment, scams and constant unwanted solicitation.”

State Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald’s office, which is representing the lottery commission, countered with its own filing Monday, arguing that officials must release Doe’s name and hometown as they appear on the signed ticket, under New Hampshire public records law.

MacDonald’s office also cited “the need for transparency and accountability of a public lottery” that distributes hundreds of millions in gross revenues and prizes annually.

“[Doe] argues that winning in excess of a half-billion dollars is life-altering money and that she prefers to live as normal a life as possible,” MacDonald’s office wrote. “The opportunity for life altering money is the essence of a large jackpot lottery such as Powerball. [Doe’s] life will be altered whether her name is released or not. [Doe’s] understandable yearning for normalcy after entering a lottery to win hundreds of millions of dollars is not a sufficient basis to shut the public out of the business of the government.”


The Confederate soldier was peculiar in that he was ever ready to fight, but never ready to submit to the routine duty and discipline of the camp or the march. The soldiers were determined to be soldiers after their own notions, and do their duty, for the love of it, as they thought best. Carlton McCarthy
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Davis
Member Avatar
Senior Carp
what is the value of naming the winner? What would happen to ticket sales if the winner was never announced? If you could impute that you could offer the discounted winnings to remain anonymous.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Aqua Letifer
Member Avatar
ZOOOOOM!
Davis
Feb 12 2018, 07:08 PM
what is the value of naming the winner?
Publicity.
I cite irreconcilable differences.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Luke's Dad
Member Avatar
Emperor Pengin
Davis
Feb 12 2018, 07:08 PM
what is the value of naming the winner? What would happen to ticket sales if the winner was never announced? If you could impute that you could offer the discounted winnings to remain anonymous.
It's required by law to show legitimacy, that they aren't just raking in your money.

Remember, these aren't private concerns. These lotteries are state/local run with transparency requirements.
The problem with having an open mind is that people keep trying to put things in it.
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
« Previous Topic · The New Coffee Room · Next Topic »
Add Reply