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A tongue dilemma
Topic Started: Jan 13 2018, 04:03 AM (86 Views)
Klaus
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HOLY CARP!!!
One of my wife's patients has an interesting dilemma.

He has tongue cancer. There's still the possibility to cure it at this point.

He could either get surgery. They'd take out most of his tongue, with all the implications for taste, speech etc.
But his chances of surviving this would be pretty good.

Or he could keep his tongue and get radiation therapy. However, the side effects would probably
be massive (he'd probably loose his taste buds, dry mouth, loosing teeth, ...). And, the likelihood of curing
the cancer would not be as good as if he'd take the surgery.

He already had a surgery scheduled but canceled an hour before it was supposed to take place.
Attempto!
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Davis
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Senior Carp
Tough for sure. Everyone’s situation and priorities are different. Personally I would be as informed as possible before the decision.
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Mikhailoh
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If you want trouble, find yourself a redhead
Considering he will probably lose most of the benefits of a tongue anyway, the decision becomes do I want to live?
Once in his life, every man is entitled to fall madly in love with a gorgeous redhead - Lucille Ball
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Jolly
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The Truth is out there.
Mikhailoh
Jan 13 2018, 04:41 AM
Considering he will probably lose most of the benefits of a tongue anyway, the decision becomes do I want to live?
+1
The main obstacle to a stable and just world order is the United States.- George Soros
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George K
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Finally
Mikhailoh
Jan 13 2018, 04:41 AM
Considering he will probably lose most of the benefits of a tongue anyway, the decision becomes do I want to live?
Radiation might not affect his speech as much.
A guide to GKSR: Click

"Now look here, you Baltic gas passer... "
- Mik, 6/14/08


Nothing is as effective as homeopathy.

"The first lesson of economics is scarcity: there is never enough of anything to fully satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics." Thomas Sowell
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Klaus
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HOLY CARP!!!
I find it interesting how there is so frequently a trade-off between probability of survival vs quality of life in medicine.

A typical example that Ms. Klaus talks about at least once a week is resection margin for cancer surgery. It happens all the time that patients with breast cancer choose some kind of breast-preserving surgery but pay with their death a few years later because the cancer was not fully removed (what they call R0 resection).
Attempto!
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George K
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Finally
Klaus
Jan 13 2018, 06:02 AM
I find it interesting how there is so frequently a trade-off between probability of survival vs quality of life in medicine.
The other question is the overall health and age of the patient.

If he is in his mid-late 70s, a reasonable choice might be the one that gives the better quality of life even though 15 year survival is unlikely (death from another cause).
A guide to GKSR: Click

"Now look here, you Baltic gas passer... "
- Mik, 6/14/08


Nothing is as effective as homeopathy.

"The first lesson of economics is scarcity: there is never enough of anything to fully satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics." Thomas Sowell
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Klaus
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HOLY CARP!!!
George K
Jan 13 2018, 06:07 AM
If he is in his mid-late 70s, a reasonable choice might be the one that gives the better quality of life even though 15 year survival is unlikely (death from another cause).
I understand that the latest trend in prostate cancer treatment for older guys is to just do nothing (they have some fancy word for that, but it boils down to "do nothing, just watch").
Attempto!
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George K
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Finally
Klaus
Jan 13 2018, 06:09 AM
George K
Jan 13 2018, 06:07 AM
If he is in his mid-late 70s, a reasonable choice might be the one that gives the better quality of life even though 15 year survival is unlikely (death from another cause).
I understand that the latest trend in prostate cancer treatment for older guys is to just do nothing (they have some fancy word for that, but it boils down to "do nothing, just watch").
That's exactly what I was going to say. Autopsies show an extremely high incidence of prostate cancer in men who are greater than 80 years of age. However, most is asymptomatic, and clinically insignificant.
A guide to GKSR: Click

"Now look here, you Baltic gas passer... "
- Mik, 6/14/08


Nothing is as effective as homeopathy.

"The first lesson of economics is scarcity: there is never enough of anything to fully satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics." Thomas Sowell
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