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A mosque at ground zero; ...supporters and protesters
Topic Started: May 26 2010, 08:57 AM (1,712 Views)
The 89th Key
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Posted Image Posted Image

Via NY Post: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/nyers_wage_jihad_vs_wtc_mosque_UgJiOBYEhrSOw4Q6hpvbQL

Quote:
 
NYers wage jihad vs. WTC mosque

By TOM TOPOUSIS and JOE MOLLICA

Last Updated: 6:29 AM, May 26, 2010

Posted: 3:43 AM, May 26, 2010


Angry relatives of 9/11 victims last night clashed with supporters of a planned mosque near Ground Zero at a raucous community-board hearing in Manhattan.

After four hours of public debate, members of Community Board 1 finally voted 29-1 in support of the project. Nine members abstained, arguing that they wanted to table the issue and vote at a later date.

The board has no official say over whether the estimated $100 million mosque and community center gets built. But the panel's support, or lack of it, is considered important in influencing public opinion.

Holding up photos of loved ones killed in the Twin Towers and carrying signs such as, "Honor 3,000, 9/11 -- No mosque!" opponents of the proposed Cordoba House on Park Place called the plan an insult to the terror-attack victims.

"That is a burial ground," said retired FDNY Deputy Chief Al Santora, referring to the fact that victims' remains were scattered for blocks.

Santora's 23-year-old son, Christopher, was the youngest firefighter to die that day.

"I do have a problem with having a mosque on top of the site where [terrorists] can gloat about what they did," said Santora, with his wife, Maureen, by his side.

About 150 people attended the emotional Greenwich Street meeting, were some shouted down others as they took their turns.

Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the head of the Cordoba Institute, which is in charge of the project, insisted that the site would help "bridge the great divide" between Muslims and the rest of America.

"We are Americans, we are Muslim Americans," Rauf said. "Many of us were born in the United States. We have no higher aspirations than to bring up our children in peace and harmony in this country."

But the crowd got ugly when he added, "Freedom of assembly is the right of all Americans."

Amid boos, one woman shouted, "Not at the World Trade Center!"

Rauf's wife, Daisy Khan, followed him to the microphone to pitched the planned community facility as "much needed party space and much needed venue space" for the area.

She was roundly booed.

Some audience members preached tolerance for the Muslim leaders.

Before the meeting, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, a supporter of the mosque, stood in front of the site and said, "What we're rejecting here is outright bigotry and hatred."

Catholic priest Kevin Madigan, of St. Peter's Church, which is about a block away, agreed.

"I think they need to establish a place such as this for people of goodwill from mainline Christian, Jewish and Muslim faiths so we can come together to talk," Madigan said.
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The 89th Key
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I support the mosque being there, the same as any place of worship. Obviously I understand the emotions involved, but I think it's important for America to show that her unwavering principles are paramount, and not only in easy situations.
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Kincaid
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HOLY CARP!!!
I support it as well. I mean, it's not right next door is it? We have to understand that Islam didn't attack the U.S., just like Christian's didn't attack the Federal Building in Oklahoma City.

I would also hope that if the mosque is built in such a way that there are views of ground zero, that many more Muslims will come to see it and pray in sorrow over it, rather than to gloat.
Kincaid - disgusted Republican Partisan since 2006.
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kenny
HOLY CARP!!!
Kincaid
May 26 2010, 09:56 AM
We have to understand that Islam didn't attack the U.S., just like Christian's didn't attack the Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
Posted Image
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John Galt
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+1 to both Kincaid and 89's posts.

You are the peacemakers who will change the world for the better.

edit: +1 to Kenny, too. You said it so well!
Edited by John Galt, May 26 2010, 10:08 AM.
Let us begin anew, remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness.
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John D'Oh
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MAMIL
Kincaid
May 26 2010, 09:56 AM
I support it as well. I mean, it's not right next door is it? We have to understand that Islam didn't attack the U.S., just like Christian's didn't attack the Federal Building in Oklahoma City.

I would also hope that if the mosque is built in such a way that there are views of ground zero, that many more Muslims will come to see it and pray in sorrow over it, rather than to gloat.
+1

I think building the mosque is a very good idea.
What do you mean "we", have you got a mouse in your pocket?
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LWpianistin
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HOLY CARP!!!
I think it's a good idea, too.
And how are you today?
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Aqua Letifer
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ZOOOOOM!
I think it's a freaking horrible idea. Sure the mosque-goers might appreciate it but it's going to piss a lot of people off. I don't see how it's going to help relations.

But they need to be allowed to do it.
I cite irreconcilable differences.
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George K
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Finally
John D'Oh
May 26 2010, 10:14 AM
Kincaid
May 26 2010, 09:56 AM
I support it as well. I mean, it's not right next door is it? We have to understand that Islam didn't attack the U.S., just like Christian's didn't attack the Federal Building in Oklahoma City.

I would also hope that if the mosque is built in such a way that there are views of ground zero, that many more Muslims will come to see it and pray in sorrow over it, rather than to gloat.
+1

I think building the mosque is a very good idea.
Those are nice sentiments on everyone's parts.

Does everyone feel as nice, warm and fuzzy about the choice of opening day: September 11, 2011?

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/mosque_madness_at_ground_zero_OQ34EB0MWS0lXuAnQau5uL

I'm sure it's just an unfortunate coincidence.
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LWpianistin
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HOLY CARP!!!
A lot of things piss a lot of people off. They don't NEED to be allowed to do it, they ARE allowed.

GEORGE!!!!! :wave:
Edited by LWpianistin, May 26 2010, 10:29 AM.
And how are you today?
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Aqua Letifer
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ZOOOOOM!
LWpianistin
May 26 2010, 10:28 AM
A lot of things piss a lot of people off. They don't NEED to be allowed to do it, they ARE allowed.

GEORGE!!!!! :wave:
Because the community board voted in that direction, yes. Before then it was up for grabs whether or not building the mosque would have been allowed. That was the point.
I cite irreconcilable differences.
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kenny
HOLY CARP!!!
People pissed off do not get what Kincaid wrote, "We have to understand that Islam didn't attack the U.S., just like Christian's didn't attack the Federal Building in Oklahoma City."

I really do not want to cater to bigots who hate an entire group for what individuals did.

... but I think avoiding 9-11 for opening would be wise.


GEORGE. :wave:
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Mark
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HOLY CARP!!!
Agree with it or not it's a bad idea that will lead to something bad happening because people are stupid.
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When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. H.G. Wells
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John Galt
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kenny
May 26 2010, 10:37 AM
People pissed off do not get what Kincaid wrote, "We have to understand that Islam didn't attack the U.S., just like Christian's didn't attack the Federal Building in Oklahoma City."

I really do not want to cater to bigots who hate an entire group for what individuals did.

... but I think avoiding 9-11 for opening would be wise.

+1
Let us begin anew, remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness.
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Kincaid
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HOLY CARP!!!
+2 Kenny.

That's just standard sensitivity.
Edited by Kincaid, May 26 2010, 10:53 AM.
Kincaid - disgusted Republican Partisan since 2006.
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Kincaid
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HOLY CARP!!!
Mark
May 26 2010, 10:50 AM
...people are stupid.
True dat.
Kincaid - disgusted Republican Partisan since 2006.
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John Galt
Fulla-Carp
You can believe him or not, but here is what the imam behind the project has to say

Quote:
 
After our proposal to build a community and cultural center two blocks from the World Trade Center site, I was pleased and gratified by the outpouring of support from city officials and a wide range of people who understand our mission.

My colleagues and I are the anti-terrorists. We are the people who want to embolden the vast majority of Muslims who hate terrorism to stand up to the radical rhetoric. Our purpose is to interweave America's Muslim population into the mainstream society.

People who are stakeholders in society, who believe they are welcomed as equal partners, do not want to destroy it. They want to build it. And there's no better demonstration of our desire to build than the construction of this center. It will help revive lower Manhattan.

The project has been mischaracterized, so I want to explain clearly what it would be. Our planned 13-story community center is intended for Park Place between Church St. and West Broadway. It is not a mosque, although it will include a space for Muslim prayer services. It will have a swimming pool, basketball court, meeting rooms, a 500-seat auditorium, banquet facilities and many other things a community needs to be healthy. The center will offer theatrical programming, art exhibitions and cooking classes. These are amenities missing now from this part of the city.

And, yes, the center will have a public memorial to the victims of 9/11 as well as a meditation room where all will be welcome for quiet reflection. The center will support soul and body.

The center will be open to all regardless of religion. Like a YMCA, the 92nd St. Y or the Jewish Community Center uptown, it will admit everyone. It will be a center for all New Yorkers.

What grieves me most is the false reporting that leads some families of 9/11 victims to think this project somehow is designed by Muslims to gloat over the attack.

That could not be further from the truth.

My heart goes out to all of the victims of 9/11. They are all heroes. But I urge you to include in your sympathy the family of Mohammad Salman Hamdani. Born in Pakistan, his parents brought him to New York as a small child. He wanted nothing more than to be an American, and he was.

A high school football player in Bayside, Queens, he graduated from Queens College. When he could not get into an American medical school, he became a part-time ambulance driver. He disappeared on 9/11; his body was found months later in the wreckage of the north tower. This 23-year-old Muslim died trying to save his fellow New Yorkers.

Religion did not separate the victims on that terrible day. Whether Protestants, Catholics, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists or any other faith, all of these people made up the fabric of New York. They all died together.

Freedom of religion is something we hold dear. It is the core of what America is all about, and it is what people worldwide respect about our country. The Koran itself says compulsion in religion is wrong.

American Muslims want to be both good Americans and good Muslims. They can be the best assets the United States has in combatting radicalism.

They know that many American values - freedom of religion, human dignity and opportunity for prosperity - are also Muslim values.

We believe that people of good faith can use the common core of their religions to find solutions to problems that will let them live together.

I have been the imam at a mosque in Tribeca for 27 years. I am as much a part of this community as anyone else. Our mosque is as much a part of the neighborhood as any church, synagogue or surrounding business. My work is to make sure mosques are not recruiting grounds for radicals.

To do that, Muslims must feel they are welcome in New York. Alienated people are open to cynicism and radicalism. Any group that believes it is under attack will breed rebellion. The proposed center is an attempt to prevent the next 9/11.

What could be a better use for the citizens in lower Manhattan? What could be a better monument to the victims of that tragic day?

Abdul Rauf is chairman of the Cordoba Initiative, an independent, nonpartisan and multinational project that seeks to use religion to improve Muslim-West relations. He is the author of "What's Right With Islam Is What's Right With America."

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/2010/05/26/2010-05-26_the_truth_about_the_mosque_the_leader_of_proposed_muslim_center_near_ground_zero.html#ixzz0p3zUZ72y



Let us begin anew, remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness.
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Kincaid
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HOLY CARP!!!
Good words from Abdul Rauf - and a heartening reminder about Mohammad Salman Hamdani.
Edited by Kincaid, May 26 2010, 11:05 AM.
Kincaid - disgusted Republican Partisan since 2006.
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John D'Oh
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MAMIL
George K
May 26 2010, 10:28 AM
Those are nice sentiments on everyone's parts.

Does everyone feel as nice, warm and fuzzy about the choice of opening day: September 11, 2011?

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/mosque_madness_at_ground_zero_OQ34EB0MWS0lXuAnQau5uL

I'm sure it's just an unfortunate coincidence.
It's very unlikely to be a coincidence. Isn't it likely that it's intended to be an expression of solidarity with the US, rather than a tactless insult?
What do you mean "we", have you got a mouse in your pocket?
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Mikhailoh
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If you want trouble, find yourself a redhead
I don't believe a word of it. No one in their right mind could possibly believe opening a mosque on this site on 9/11 is a good idea. I think it is breathtaking arrogance and is met with a subtle wink and a smirk in much of the Islamic world.
Once in his life, every man is entitled to fall madly in love with a gorgeous redhead - Lucille Ball
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John D'Oh
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MAMIL
Mikhailoh
May 26 2010, 11:10 AM
I don't believe a word of it. No one in their right mind could possibly believe opening a mosque on this site on 9/11 is a good idea. I think it is breathtaking arrogance and is met with a subtle wink and a smirk in much of the Islamic world.
The Muslims I know abhor what is being done by extremists in the name of their religion. In addition, there's no smirking going on when the Taliban and other extremists kill, terrorise and maim innocent Muslims.
What do you mean "we", have you got a mouse in your pocket?
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John Galt
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John D'Oh
May 26 2010, 11:09 AM
George K
May 26 2010, 10:28 AM
Those are nice sentiments on everyone's parts.

Does everyone feel as nice, warm and fuzzy about the choice of opening day: September 11, 2011?

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/mosque_madness_at_ground_zero_OQ34EB0MWS0lXuAnQau5uL

I'm sure it's just an unfortunate coincidence.
It's very unlikely to be a coincidence. Isn't it likely that it's intended to be an expression of solidarity with the US, rather than a tactless insult?
The date has no meaning aside from what we each ascribe to it. It can be viewed as a slap in the face or worse, or it can be viewed as a gesture of remembrance and shared grief.

It's up to each of us to choose. There is no right answer.
Let us begin anew, remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness.
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Mikhailoh
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If you want trouble, find yourself a redhead
If you were going to do something like this, would you pick the date they did? Of course you wouldn't.

I hope their sensibilities are as you describe. But I'm from Missouri, nd this does not show me what folks here are describing. The silence and inaction of Islam in the face of these horrible terrorist activities around the world has been deafening.
Once in his life, every man is entitled to fall madly in love with a gorgeous redhead - Lucille Ball
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Kincaid
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HOLY CARP!!!
Well, I think most Americans would feel it is not the right date to open it. Again, just a cultural difference I suspect. I would expect that they'll change it once they understand it is not viewed favorably by most New Yorkers.
Kincaid - disgusted Republican Partisan since 2006.
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John Galt
Fulla-Carp
Kincaid, he's been the imam at a mosque in Tribeca for 27 years. The choice of the date is not likely to be an oversight.

I cannot know with certainty what is in his heart (lost my crystal ball during my last move), but I'm willing to take a leap of faith that his intentions are good.
Let us begin anew, remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness.
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