Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Survival of the Fittest, a RPing board loosely based off of Koshun Takami's Battle Royale, with its own unique plot and spin on the 'deadly game'. We've been around quite a while, and are now in our thirteenth year, so don't worry about us going anywhere any time soon!

If you're a newcomer and interested in joining, then please make sure you check out the rules. You may also want to read the FAQ, introduce yourself and stop by the chat to meet some of our members. If you're still not quite sure where to start, then we have a great New Member's Guide with a lot of useful information about getting going. Don't hesitate to PM a member of staff (they have purple usernames) if you have any questions about SOTF and how to get started!

Let the games begin!

Username:   Password:
Locked Topic
G122 - Soryu, Mizore[/DECEASED]; storyspoiler's character
Topic Started: Aug 21 2010, 01:29 PM (874 Views)
MurderWeasel
Member Avatar
You've been counting stars, now you're counting on me
[ *  *  *  *  *  *  * ]
DECEASED


Name: Mizore Soryu/"Radio Asuka"
Gender: Female
Age: 18
Grade: 12th Grade
School: Bayview Secondary School
Hobbies and Interests: Art, political philosophy, freeganism, aerosols, free running.

Appearance: Mizore Soryu is rangy at 5'5" and 135 pounds, with long limbs, pale skin and larger-than-average hands and feet. Her hair, naturally black, is now evened with lavender stripes, and partially tied (with a rainbow of ribbons) into haphazard braids. Her eyes, naturally brown, are now contact-tinted anime style bright green. Her face is large, high-cheekboned, pale, heart-shaped with a slightly pronounced nose, manga-style striking. She wears a patchwork longcoat, homemade from scraps of cool-colored fabric (purple, blue, silver, black and green); under it, she wears a white ribbed tank top and a pleated dark purple skirt that hits her knees, opaque forest-colored tights, and combat boots decorated with patches and glitter-glue in every color of the rainbow.

Biography: Squished between an overachieving older sister and three well-rounded little brothers, Mizore Soryu was the child her parents were grateful to let take care of herself--and that was the way she liked it.

Ever since she was young, Mizore had been drawn to outlaw societies. Robin Hood. Subcultures. Secret signals. Standing up to a much bigger enemy, a power to whom victory seemed inevitable, standing up, fighting, and winning. And she loved display, the impossible, the circus, the bright colors and pictures of comic books, anime and manga. The bright lights of cities, New York, Hong Kong. People, smells, sounds, the unusual things they said, street magicians, David Blaine, heists, art thieves, things done on principle, mardi gras beads. Clever demonstrations, protests, controversies, conspiracies, subterfuge, and spectacle. In short, she loved the art of the popular, the art of the everyday, the unusual world.

This love of art was encouraged (somewhat skeptically) by her parents, and encouraged (much more earnestly) by her teachers and counselors. Of course, they didn't quite get it; they wanted her to draw with pencils on paper, when she wanted to draw with invisible ink on the walls. They wanted her to become Talented at Art, so she could make portfolios and get into Honors programs and, eventually, good colleges. Mizore never really bothered with portfolios on her own initiative, and certainly didn't get the scramble for colleges and honors programs. She just wanted her art to be seen. But she was laid-back, so she did what her parents and teachers said.

Her real passion in art was cities. She could build fairy cities out of scavenged trash, turn dumpsters into swimming pools, make vacant lots into rose gardens, and build, on a hot summer's day, a sun-reflecting mirror collection to burn pictures into a neighbor's wall. She didn't get why some of these things were "art" and some weren't, according to her teachers and parents, but mostly she was satisfied.

And then came the difficult time.

On Mizore's thirteenth birthday, Mizore's mother announced that she was pregnant--with what was to become the first of three boys, each born ten months after the other. Mizore's parent's marriage became impossibly strained, but neither parent would contemplate divorce--it would "hurt the children". Mizore's friends grew breasts and odd obsessions; she started drifting away from them. Her grades, always A's and B's, fell into the consistent C range, much to her parent's disappointment. She started keeping a "wall of atrocties"; articles clipped out from newspapers about the horrible state of the world. Each night, they would help her feel black as she slept.

It didn't take long, however, for Mizore to decide she would fight that wall.

She dismissed all mainstream activist organizations almost immediately; they seemed wishy-washy and not at all committed to the change she wanted to make. She wanted people who were not afraid to be radical, bravery and fire.

She joined (and later unjoined) PETA and became vegetarian. She hung out with anarchists, free runners, freegans. She read political theory, and became a pacifist. She studied nonviolent movements, Objectivism, libertarianism, racism, democratic socialism, Orwellian societies and the politics of farming. She dyed her hair red, and wrapped it in ribbons. She learned the skills and technicalities of free running. She volunteered for Greenpeace campaigns. She went to many, many demonstrations, including a short stint with Black Bloc. She became acquainted with sticking flowers in guns, freezing rain and police hostility. Adbusters magazine was her enduring love--anti-consumerism, corporate malfeasance, strange political philosophy, and art--and she began freelancing for them.

Between the occasional raids on her radical friends, the arrests for creating tent cities, sitting in, and protesting sans permit and the state's laws (and percieved laws) against scavenging through dumpsters and spraying art on the streets, Mizore dealt with the police a lot during these years. Through this, she learned to use art as "peaceful resistance" in devilishly effective ways--also to bite her tongue, keep a cool head, and stick by what she thought was right. Luckily her parents, who in the past would have cared about Mizore's minor law-enforcement run-ins, were currently in the process of radically loosening up on Mizore's upbringing; three boys to take care of didn't leave them much choice. Her school pulled her worriedly into the principle's office a few times; after sitting through a number of passionate diatribes on the rightness of her actions, they also left the girl-artist alone.

And at fifteen, with help of the anarchists, the free runners and the freegans, she became "Radio Asuka".

Radio Asuka is Mizore’s street artist handle. Her signature, with which she signs anonymous, colorful and huge pieces of graffiti art. The art of “Radio Asuka” now has a good-sized fanbase on the internet and is becoming famous locally (to the point where small museums have courted her pseudonym's art through Life on Enceladus, and where proving her identity was enough to get her an art scholarship at Bennington). Though her true identity is known only to the Life On Enceladus commune, the artist behind the swirling "Radio Asuka" signature is increasingly a topic of conversation among arty people in St. Paul. In school, though, she's just Mizore--a rangy Asian freegan artist with radical politics and lavender braids, a counterculture wonk, a Radio Asuka fan, well-liked in the way kooky harmless artists are, but not particularly close to anyone in Bayview. She's never joined any clubs, and most of her time outside of school is spent with Life On Enceladus.

Why become a graffiti artist? Some of her more politically active pals sneered at her. She explained.

Because even the people who would never look at a PETA brief, who would dismiss anything Greenpeace had to say just because it was Greenpeace--even they looked at art.

And even more than that, Radio Asuka made this sucky world scads more beautiful--and if she could make a city prettier, perk up a day and open up a world, she was happy.

Advantages: She's a sometimes-freegan, so she knows how to scrap and scavenge and scrape by, and she'll eat practically anything (including plants; she has a bit of experience seeking food in the wild, and will use it). She has a genuinely cool head, and no particular psychological need for people or creature comforts. Around buildings, her free running skills could help her out of sticky situations.
Disadvantages: She's pretty sure she's gonna die, so she probably won't even play--at least not the way Danya wants her to. While she wouldn't describe herself as a strict pacifist (she hangs out with people who know what that word means) she has no intention of using violence against her classmates, of giving the terrorists that satisfaction.

Designated Number: Female student no. 122

----

Designated Weapon: Caltrops
Conclusion: Perhaps she'll be able to put her good mobility to use, but that peaceful streak just ruins her longterm potential. Such a pity.


DECEASED
V7:
Juliette Sargent drawn by Mimi and Ryuki
Alton Gerow drawn by Mimi
Lavender Ripley drawn by Mimi
Phillip Olivares drawn by Ryuki
Library Vee
Misty Browder
Offline Profile Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
ZetaBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Join the millions that use us for their forum communities. Create your own forum today.
« Previous Topic · V4 Student Roster · Next Topic »
Locked Topic