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Singapore Revolver
Topic Started: Jan 12 2018, 03:33 AM (112 Views)
socorro
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Here's the rear sleeve of a copy of Revolver, manufactured in Singapore but intended for sale in Malaysia and Hong Kong. The disc has one box Parlophone labels. Spot the error:

Posted Image
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Jae
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I'll exclude myself from this. ;)
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pinio65
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Your Mother Should Know instead Yellow Submarine .
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servi
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Sung by Ringo ???
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socorro
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Pinio65 and Servi are both on the right track, but here's a bit more color.

After Singapore enacted a censorship law in 1970 (not 100% sure of the year but that's close), EMI's Southeast Asia operation (which was headquartered in Singapore, but also covered Malaysia and Hong Kong) began producing two versions of some LPs: the original UK version for distribution in Hong Kong and Malaysia, and a censored version (removing and/or replacing banned songs) for distribution in Singapore.

The censored version of Revolver replaced Yellow Submarine with Your Mother Should Know, and carried a different catalog number, SLPEA-1005. The SLPEA series was used for LPs that were not part of the regular EMI catalog.

This one is wrong because it has the SLPEA track list, but the PCS catalog number.

There are correct sleeves for both versions (SLPEA with censored track list, and PCS with regular track list).

I'm not sure how rare this one is -- Jae pointed out another one like it online, so it may be common -- but it is interesting and I had never noticed this anomaly before.


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servi
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Interesting, thanks !
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Jae
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socorro,Jan 13 2018
04:32 AM
After Singapore enacted a censorship law in 1970 (not 100% sure of the year but that's close)...

Correct. In 1967 the Singaporean Government passed the Undesirable Publications Act. The act "allow[ed] for the ban, seizure, censorship, or restriction of written, visual, or musical materials if they determine that such materials threaten the stability of the State, are pro-Communist, contravene moral norms, are pornographic, show excessive or gratuitous sex and violence, glamorise or promote drug use, or incite racial, religious or linguistic animosities".

In 1970 [according to the Singapore Ministry of Communications and Information], the Singaporean Government started banning [this being the term used by the Singaporean Government] the sale of pop records that were considered to contravene the Act, particularly those that extolled the drug culture or hippy movement. The axe fell on a number of Beatles tracks (amongst numerous others).

I think I've posted the longer story here before.

socorro,Jan 13 2018
04:32 AM
The SLPEA series was used for LPs that were not part of the regular EMI catalog.

Not quite correct - the LPEA series was the domestic Singapore Parlophone series for international artists, used for Parlophone titles released outside of the PCS series (so for those originating in Singapore or through EMI subs such as EMI Australia). Much like how PCSO 75** was used in Australia and PCSM 6*** in NZ. Because, obviously, they couldn't use the same master series as the master (EMI UK).

Columbia had a series too - it started earlier than Parlophone's (which started in 1968).

But all titles were definitely considered part of the regular EMI catalogue, hence why they were given such a number.
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